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August 2016 update

Another 75 items have been added to the Virtual Library, bringing the total number of items to over 500, representing over 150 languages ... read more

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RESULTS: 48 ITEMS FOR CATEGORY Academic papers & notices

Barngala [bjb] see all Barngala
Source: Ghil’ad Zuckermann, Paul Monaghan
‘Revival Linguistics’, or ‘Revivalistics’ is proposed as a new branch of linguistics, and is pioneered by Ghil’ad Zuckermann and his team in the Linguistics department, University of Adelaide. In particular, the approach is being applied to the Barngala language, and this paper describes ‘talknological’ innovations such as the use of social media in language revival activities.
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Bininj Gun-wok [gup] see all Bininj Gun-wok
Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Dalabon [ngk] see all Dalabon
Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Darug [xdk] see all Darug
Source: Richard Green
Richard Green, a Dharug community member and language teacher, has been instrumental in the reclamation of the Dharug language. In this paper, Richard describes his personal history and relationship to his language, his initiation of teaching it in schools, and about his teaching resources and methods.
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Dieri [dif] see all Dieri
Source: Mobile Language Team/University of Adelaide
Bibliogrpahy of online and other references and resources for Dieri.
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Gunwinygu [gup] see all Gunwinygu
Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Gurindji [gue] see all Gurindji
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Jawoyn [djn] see all Jawoyn
Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Jiwarli [mem] see all Jiwarli
Source: Peter K. Austin
An outline of Jiwarli’s relationships to other languages and its formal linguistic characteristics.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
Slides from Peter’s LSA Summer Institute course on Jiwarli, covering its social and historical contexts, kinship, fieldwork, corpus, language typology, phonology, morphology and syntax.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
Paper arguing that in Jiwarli and related languages, word order serves pragmatic purposes in organising discourse, while the morphological shapes of words signal grammatical functions and anaphoric relations.
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Kamilaroi/Gamilaraay [kld] see all Kamilaroi/Gamilaraay
Source: Peter K. Austin
An outline of the history of the research on the Gamilaraay language with a focus on some of the people who have contributed to its documentation from the 1830s to today.
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Source: John Giacon / LDC
A paper considering linguists’ roles, methods, and principles in language revival, largely based on John’s experience with Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
A downloadable academic grammar, complied from historical sources, with introduction to the people and language, and notes on the closely related Yuwaalaraay and Yuwaaliyaay languages. Published 1993.
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Kaurna [zku] see all Kaurna
Source: Rob Amery
Robís paper describes a project to develop and broadcast two-hour-long radio programs in and about the Kaurna language to support its revitalisation. Radio and associated podcasts and downloads offer a means of reaching a wider audience, making the language interesting and accessible.
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Kriol and pidgins [rop] see all Kriol and pidgins
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Lardil [lbz] see all Lardil
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Linngithigh [lnj] see all Linngithigh
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Malyangapa [yga] see all Malyangapa
Source: Luise Hercus and Peter K. Austin
The authors propose a Yarli language subgroup consisting of Malyangapa, Wadikali, and Yardliyawara. These languages were spoken in the far north-west corner of New South Wales and adjacent areas in South Australia and Queensland.
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Mawng [mph] see all Mawng
Source: Ruth Singer / ELAR
Archive deposit: focussed on dictionary definitions of triangular kinship terms and names for flora and fauna and associated knowledge. The deposit also includes audio recordings of myths and stories about traditional customs. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols, and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Sam Hellmuth, Frank Kügler & Ruth Singer
Descriptive and theoretical results of a corpus-based phonetic study of pitch accent in Mawng (Goulburn Islands, NT).
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Murrinh-Patha [mwf] see all Murrinh-Patha
Source: School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Rachel’s page contains links to papers on the syntax of Aboriginal languages, including a grammar and learner’s guide for Wambaya, and several papers on Murrinh-Patha
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Source: Linda Barwick/Allan Marett/Michael Walsh/Joe Blythe/Nick Reid/Lysbeth Ford
This site documents the history, language and music of public songs and dances composed and performed at Wadeye, NT (aka Port Keats). You can search the database, listen to songs and see information about the singers, translations, and other musicological documentation. Some of the recordings are for community access only or are not publicly available, but you can apply for access. See also the Murrinh-Patha song project description.
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Ndjebbana [djj] see all Ndjebbana
Source: Glenn Auld
Application of computer assisted learning among the Kunibidji, focusing on the use of electronic talking books in Ndjébbana displayed on touch-screens, to look at the potential for language learning and cultural understanding.
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Pitta Pitta [pit] see all Pitta Pitta
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Walmajarri [wmt] see all Walmajarri
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Wambaya [wmb] see all Wambaya
Source: School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Rachel’s page contains links to papers on the syntax of Aboriginal languages, including a grammar and learner’s guide for Wambaya, and several papers on Murrinh-Patha
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Warlpiri [wbp] see all Warlpiri
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Warumungu [wrm] see all Warumungu
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Wemba Wemba [xww] see all Wemba Wemba
Source: Jessica Milner Davis/The Fine Print
See the Endnotes starting p 26 which note that in fact ‘moom’ means “buttocks” or “anus” in various Victorian languages and ‘ba’ is a suffix meaning “at”, “in” or “on”, so that Moomba represents someone’s attempt to render “up your bum” in these languages (source: Barry Blake, 1981. Australian Aboriginal Languages).
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Wik Ngathan [wig] see all Wik Ngathan
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Wik Yi’anh [wij] see all Wik Yi’anh
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Wik-Mungkan [wim] see all Wik-Mungkan
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Wik-Ngatharr [wik] see all Wik-Ngatharr
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale’s papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Wiradjuri [wrh] see all Wiradjuri
Source: Declan Rurenga/Daily Advertiser
Wiradjuri gibirr (man) Mark Saddler was one of the first 15 people to graduate from the new http://www.csu.edu.au/courses/graduate-certificate-in-wiradjuri-language-culture-and-heritage">Graduate Certificate in Wiradjuri Language, Culture and Heritage course at Charles Sturt Universityís (CSU) in December 2015.
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Woi wurrung [wyi] see all Woi wurrung
Source: Jessica Milner Davis/The Fine Print
See the Endnotes starting p 26 which note that in fact ‘moom’ means “buttocks” or “anus” in various Victorian languages and ‘ba’ is a suffix meaning “at”, “in” or “on”, so that Moomba represents someone’s attempt to render “up your bum” in these languages (source: Barry Blake, 1981. Australian Aboriginal Languages).
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Worrorra [wro] see all Worrorra
Source: Mark Clendon
A detailed linguistic description of the Worrorra language (PDF, 494 pages).
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Yidiny [yii] see all Yidiny
Source: Claire Bowern, Barry Alpher and Erich Round
A poster revisiting description by Dixon, arguing for the use of acoustic analysis rather than impressionistic analyses based on written examples.
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Yolngu [aus-x-yoq] see all Yolngu
Source: Michael Christie and Helen Verran (editors)
Issue of Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts with a variety of papers on Yolngu culture and language, including topics such as language learning, translation, and intellectual property.
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Source: Michael Christie
The author argues that digital forms like databases and metadata are not culturally neutral; they typically opaquely encode assumptions about structure and representation, and how one interacts with them. By revealing these assumptions, Yolngu (Aboriginal) forms of knowledge and literacy can be applied to database design and deployment; however ‘long term, deeply negotiated and collaborative processes where questions of the nature, politics and creation of knowledge remain central.’
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Source: Michael Christie / Helen Verran / Waymamba Gaykamangu
This project ran from 2003-6 and investigated ‘digital systems which support indigenous people building collective memory’ with a focus on Yolngu peoples. See in particular the publications page for a large number of interesting papers about digital technologies and Aboriginal knowledge.
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Yuwaalaraay [aus-x-yuq] see all Yuwaalaraay
Source: John Giacon / LDC
A paper considering linguists’ roles, methods, and principles in language revival, largely based on John’s experience with Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
A downloadable academic grammar, complied from historical sources, with introduction to the people and language, and notes on the closely related Yuwaalaraay and Yuwaaliyaay languages. Published 1993.
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Yuwaaliyaay [aux-x-ywq] see all Yuwaaliyaay
Source: Peter K. Austin
A downloadable academic grammar, complied from historical sources, with introduction to the people and language, and notes on the closely related Yuwaalaraay and Yuwaaliyaay languages. Published 1993.
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Many languages or language not specified
Source: Robert Hodge
Draws on Eric Michaels’ "cowboy anthropology" which, while stirring, conformed to structuralist linguistics "which has virtually monopolised the study of Aboriginal languages".
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Source: Patrick McConvell/Harold Koch/Laurent Dousset/Jane Simpson/Jeanie Bell/Piers kelly
Kinship charts, terminologies and systems from published and archival sources for over 607 Australian Aboriginal languages [editor’s note: the large number of languages (actually, language names) results from the project’ use of language names and spellings as found in the literature; a given language can have many names or spellings. Most people agree that the number of Australian languages is in the range 250-350].
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Source: Lester-Irabinna Rigney
In this paper from 2002, Lester-Irabinna Rigney advocated for the formal recognition of Indigenous languages through constitional amendment and the establishment of a National Indigenous Languages Institute. The paper also discusses issues of reconciliation and language stabilisation and revitalisation.
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Source: Kevin Lowe / Michael Walsh
A paper describing recent language revitalisation efforts in NSW and comparing them to those in California.
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Source: Mary-Anne Gale
Mary-Anneís paper examines the pedagogy of teaching Aboriginal languages, ranging from those undergoing revival to stronger languages. She challenges current communicative and functional approaches, which are often not appropriate to revival situations, particularly if there are no fluent speakers or teachers and the main language resources are written.
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Source: Nicholas Thieberger
The Internet Archive version of Nick’s comprehensive 1996 annotated bibliography and guide to the Indigenous languages of most of Western Australia.
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Source: Charles E. Grimes/Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
The paper argues that the NT government and its education system continue to ignore solid research on best practice education in Indigenous communities. also includes an extensive bibliography on language and education in multilingual societies, many linked to online sources. [PDF]
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Source: Harold Koch / Rachel Nordlinger
Provides an overview of Australian languages, including their linguistic structures, genetic relationships, and issues of language maintenance and revitalisation. Note: unfortunately this desirable book is another high-priced volume from De Gruyter (even the PDF version costs $350).
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Source: Michael Walsh
A general survey of the nature and history of Australian languages (chapter 1 of Walsh & Yallop (eds) 1993 Language and Culture in Aboriginal Australia. [PDF, 13 pages]
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Source: Australian National University
Dr Hercus’ departmental web page. See also Dr Hercus’ publications and research projects.
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Source: Ghil’ad Zuckermann / Shiori Shauto-Neoh / Giovanni Matteo Quer
A paper proposing a compensation scheme for loss of Indigenous languages, paralleling compensation schemes for some Stolen Generations victims. The paper describes the history of linguicide in Australia, and the benefits of using compensation to support language revival. The paper appeared in Australian Aboriginal Studies 2014/1. See also the Lingua Franca episode on this topic.
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Source: Nick Thieberger
A list of Nick’s publications, including several online items on Australian languages and linguistic methodologies.
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Source: Claire Bowern / ABC
Robyn Williams interviews Claire Bowern, who talks about why languages can become endangered and why it matters, drawing on examples in Australia, where every Indigenous language is endangered. [audio and transcript]
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Source: Michael Clyne and Sandra Kipp
An analysis of changing patterns of language diversity; includes statistics for languages spoken including Aboriginal languages.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
Peter’s web page has many downloadable publications and links to blog posts representing his long involvement with Aboriginal languages in NSW, SA and WA. See also Peter’s page on Academia.edu.
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Source: Jonathan Harrington / Macquarie University
Sketch of the phonetics and phonologies of Australian languages.
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Source: John Hobson / Kevin Lowe / Susan Poetsch / Michael Walsh / Others
Full text of this 2010 edited volume with foreword by Jeanie Bell and contributed chapters on language policy and planning, language in communities, language centres, language in education, literacy and oracy, technology, and language documentation. Direct link [PDF, 489 pages]
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Source: The University of Melbourne
The Unit’s researches aspects of Indigenous language in Australia across generations and communities, and how to identify and address the language needs of Indigenous people. The Unit consists of a multidisciplinary team which examines the sound system, syntax and semantics, discourse features and gesture, of languages, and explores their implications for children’s language learning.
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Source: Kevin Lowe / Anna Ash
Background to the rise of language revitalisation efforts in NSW, and the prominent role of the NSW Board of Studies in providing input and support.
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Source: Convenors: David Nash and Jane Simpson
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, April 28-29, 1998. Focussed on patterns of motion lexicalisation and description in Australian languages. Includes list of papers with links to informative abstracts.
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Source: John Hobson
This paper examines issues surrounding Indigenous languages revitalisation in NSW and strategies for increasing the number of Aboriginal language teachers in the state
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