What's new

You can now see items according to when they were first listed in the Virtual Library:

• Updated 30 Dec 2012 - added 22 resources. With nearly 80 resources added in 2012, the site now lists over 330 resources. Search by date-entered now available (above). Full-text searching was implemented in June 2012. See News.

• To find a resource, search, or choose a state, language or category; see Help for details.

Search for:

Search in: All fields Language name/code ?

 

Choose a state/region:

(NSW includes ACT)

 

RESULTS: 17 ITEMS FOR CATEGORY Academic papers & notices

Gurindji [gue]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Jiwarli [mem]
Source: Peter K. Austin
An outline of Jiwarli's relationships to other languages and its formal linguistic characteristics.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Source: Peter K. Austin
Paper arguing that in Jiwarli and related languages, word order serves pragmatic purposes in organising discourse, while the morphological shapes of words signal grammatical functions and anaphoric relations.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Kamilaroi/Gamilaraay [kld]
Source: Peter K. Austin
An outline of the history of the research on the Gamilaraay language with a focus on some of the people who have contributed to its documentation from the 1830s to today.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Kaurna [zku]
Source: Rob Amery
Rob
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Kayardild [gyd]
Source: EMELD School of best practice/Nick Evans, Baden Hughes, Cathy Bow, Steven Bird
Audio recordings collected by Nick Evans are associated with an interlinear, time-aligned glossed text, lexicon, and metadata.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Malyangapa [yga]
Source: Luise Hercus and Peter K. Austin
The authors propose a Yarli language subgroup consisting of Malyangapa, Wadikali, and Yardliyawara. These languages were spoken in the far north-west corner of New South Wales and adjacent areas in South Australia and Queensland.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Mawng [mph]
Source: Ruth Singer
Short bibliography on Mawng, and Ruth's webpage with links to research papers about Mawng.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Ndjebbana [djj]
Source: Glenn Auld
Application of computer assisted learning among the Kunibidji, focusing on the use of electronic talking books in Ndjébbana displayed on touch-screens, to look at the potential for language learning and cultural understanding.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Wambaya [wmb]
Source: Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Rachel's page contains links to papers on the syntax of Aboriginal languages, including Wambaya.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Many languages or language not specified
Source: Robert Hodge
Draws on Eric Michaels' "cowboy anthropology" which, while stirring, conformed to structuralist linguistics "which has virtually monopolised the study of Aboriginal languages".
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Source: Australian Linguistic Society
Most issues of the AJL contain articles on Australian languages. Use this page to look up its Contents and Abstracts.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Source: Mary-Anne Gale
Mary-Anne
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Source: David Nathan
This paper, given at Learning IT Together in 1999; argues that some rhetorical positions, as well as overtheorised approaches to IT in Aboriginal settings, work against the effective use of computing in support of language maintenance and revitalisation. It provides an interesting backdrop for surveying what has and has not been achieved through use of IT since 1999.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Source: Australian National University
Dr Hercus' departmental web page.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Source: Michael Clyne and Sandra Kipp
An analysis of changing patterns of language diversity; includes statistics for languages spoken incluging Aboriginal languages.
Update or give feedback on this item

 

Source: Convenors: David Nash and Jane Simpson
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, April 28-29, 1998. Focussed on patterns of motion lexicalisation and description in Australian languages. Includes list of papers with links to informative abstracts.
Update or give feedback on this item