What’s new

August 2016 update

Another 75 items have been added to the Virtual Library, bringing the total number of items to over 500, representing over 150 languages ... read more

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RESULTS: 620 ITEMS FOR LANGUAGE

Aboriginal English [aus-x-aeq]
Source: Diana Eades
Background issues, vocab, sounds, grammar etc.
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Source: Australian Council of TESOL Associations
Various resources and research aimed at improving educational outcomes through focus on the interface between Aboriginal English and ESL (English as a Second Language).
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Source: VACL
Useful one-pager documents about topics including language revival, protocol, linguistic terminology, spelling and pronunciation, and Koorie English.
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Source: The Victorian Aboriginal Education Association (VAEAI)
The protocols outline principles and procedures for the Victorian education sector to respect Koorie communities in setting up curricula and teaching, including languages, and with particular attention to respecting and understanding Koorie English.
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Source: Farzad Sharifian / Adriano Truscott / Patricia Konigsberg / Ian G Malcolm / Glenys Collard / WA Department of Education
Detailed report of a project exploring ways in which Aboriginal-English speaking students (mis)understand school-based literacy materials written in Standard Australian English. Includes many useful examples and resources. [PDF, 118 pages]
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Adnyamathanha [adt]
Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: Mobile Language Team / University of Adelaide
The MLT website has resources for a number of South Australian languages. This page for Adyamathanha is one of the more comprehensive ones.
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Source: Sonja Vivienne/Marjo Stroud/Luke Jurevicius/Arthur Moody/Vishus Productions
A short film about the production of an animated video for children in Adnyamathanha.
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Source: Australia Children’s Television Foundation
A digital resource, based around animation and interactive games, exploring the Adnyamathanha language, culture, stories and traditions. Note: access is on a commercial basis.
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Alyawarra [aly]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Source: Warlpiri Media Association/PAW Media and Communications
Media group from Yuendemu. Over 25 years of producing TV, radio and music. A key role of PAW Media is the production of media content in languages to support languages including Alyawarr, (Eastern) Arrernte, Luritja, Warumungu, Anmatyerr, Gurindji, Kaytetye, Pintubi, and Warlpiri. See the Productions page for their wide range of outputs, including Bush Mechanics.
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Amurdak [amg]
Source: Robert Mailhammer / ELAR
Archive deposit: audio and annotated texts from a range of genres, from the Minjilang community on Croker Island. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Anindilyakwa [aoi]
Source: Northern Territory Library/others
A flashcard app with 20 everyday words and phrases in Anindilyakwa and English. Also includes video of hand gestures.
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Source: Marie Van Egmond / ELAR
Archive deposit: audio plus transcriptions documenting the morpho-syntax of Enindhilyakwa (Groote Eylandt, Gulf of Carpentaria).
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: RNLD
A list of some mobile apps for Indigenous languages, including Anindilyakwa, Gamilaraay, Iwaidja, Nyoongar, Yawuru, and Yugambeh. Most are basic wordlists.
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Source: James Bednall/Crikey
A linguist's experience of working with the language Anindilyakwa, providing an introduction to the Warnindilyakwa people and their language. An item from ,a href="http://blogs.crikey.com.au/fullysic/">Fully (sic), Crikey's language blog, which features several posts on Australian languages.
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Anjumarla [gue]
Source: Gerhardt Laves/David Nash
Wordlist collected by Gerhardt Laves, modified and presented by David Nash. This languageis similar to Gurindji.
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Anmatyerr [amx]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: PAW media
IndigiTUBE channel for accessing PAW content. Easy access to over 80 songs from the PAW communities and in the PAW languages
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Arabana [ard]
Source: Luistxo Fernandez
Information, including placenames, for the languages: Guugu Yimithirr, Dyirbal, Gooniyandi, Arabana-Wangkangurru, Yagara and Yugambeh.
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Arrernte [aus-x-arq]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: Al Jazeera
A detailed film report by Al Jazeera on the history of the destruction of Aboriginal languages, the story of those surviving, and the efforts of people to revive their languages. Features speakers of Darug (a particularly impressive contribution by Richard Green), Arrernte (John Cavenagh), Gumbaynggirr (Michael Jarrett), Pitjanatjara and others.
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Source: Christobel Swann
Christobel Swann is a Conservationist who works as an Aboriginal Linguist in Alice Springs. She gives a personal and community perspective on the state of languages, especially her own, southern Arrernte.
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Awabakal [awk]
Source: Miromaa Aboriginal Language and Technology Centre
A wide range of books, posters, games and other resources for learning Awabakal.
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Source: Arwarbukarl Cultural Resource Association
This website is the home for Miromaa software, created by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people as a database for gathering, organising, analysing and creating resources for languages.
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Source: Arwarbukarl Cultural Resource Association / Daryn McKenny / Faith Baisden / Others
Wide-ranging site includes news, includes links to a range of maps, lists of languages and language centres, resources on placenames, plus information about various language courses and programs.
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Ayapathu [ayd]
Source: Philip Hamilton
Ayapathu is a Cape York language. Includes multimedia annotations.
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Badjala [gbw]
Source: State Library of Queensland
A set of interactive multimedia audio books for learning basic vocabulary of Queensland languages including Butchullla, Gudjal, Gunggari, and Yugambeh.
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Source: Joy Bonner / ABC
A lullaby sung by Joy Bonner of Hervey Bay. Sung in Butchulla, a language of SE Queensland, with audio and lyrics.
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Banyjima [pnw]
Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Barngarla [bjb]
Source: Facebook public group
A community group for Barngarla descendants, with a particular interest in reclaiming the language.
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Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: SBS/Andy Park
Article about the revival efforts for Barngarla (Eyre Peninsula) including an interview with Harry Dare explaining the significance of the language for him, and with Ghil'ad Zuckermann, who says that Australia is one of the worst countries for destroying languages.
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Source: Ghil'ad Zuckermann, Paul Monaghan
‘Revival Linguistics’, or ‘Revivalistics’ is proposed as a new branch of linguistics, and is pioneered by Ghil'ad Zuckermann and his team in the Linguistics department, University of Adelaide. In particular, the approach is being applied to the Barngala language, and this paper describes ‘talknological’ innovations such as the use of social media in language revival activities.
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Source: Anna Goldsworthy / The Monthly
Lively journalistic account of the teaching and revival of the Barngala language at a workshop run by Ghil’ad Zuckerman. See also Ghil’ad Zuckermann’s website.
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Bayungu [bxj]
Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Bidawal [aus-x-bdq]
Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Bidjara [bym]
Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Bigambul [xbe]
Source: R.H. Matthews
This 1902 document has grammatical and vocabulary description for some languages of southern Queensland, central NSW, and northern Victoria, including (as Matthews spelt them) Yualeai, Pikumbil, Kawambarai, Kurnu, Tyake (Mystic), Dyirringan, Yota-yota, and Bureba. [PDF 190 pages]
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Bilinarra [aus-x-biq]
Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Boon Wurrung [aus-x-boq]
Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Bundjalung [bdy]
Source: Rick Cook / ABC
A short film where Rick Cook talks about the importance of language and shows some vocabulary boards in Bunjalung.
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Bunuba [bck]
Source: Bunuba Cultural Enterprises
Jandamarra led resistance against the invasion of his people’s land in the late 19th century. This website presents modern stage play performances based on Jandamarra’s life, with use of the Bunuba language. The site also has a section on Bunuba language including map, and article Warrior’s language of resistance.
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Burarra [bvr]
Source: ARDS
A range of dictionaries for several Yol?u languages; also specialised English-Yol?u anatomy and legal dictionaries.
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Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Kathleen Glasgow and David Glasgow/AuSIL
Dictionary consists of approximately 4000 headwords. Burarra is spoken by the Burarra and Gun-nartpa people (approximately 600 speakers) in the Blyth and Cadell River regions and in the town of Maningrida in North-Central Arnhem Land.
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Source: ARDS
Background information and 900-word dictionary of the Dha?u languages of Yol?u matha -- (Wangurri, G
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Source: Margaret Carew / ELAR
Archive deposit: recordings of Gun-nartpa (a Burarra dialect) speakers in the Cadell river region of north-central Arnhem Land from a range of ages. Time-aligned annotations will be added. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols, and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: ARDS
English wordlist for the Dha?u Dictionary.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Source: Marion Waiguma / Margaret Carew
A short film in which Marion Waiguma and Margaret Carew talk about their work in Burarra language from Maningrida, Arnhem Land.
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Burduna [bxn]
Source: Eleanora Deak/Albert Burgman/Peter Austin/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Dictionary, finderlist and topical index.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Darug [xdk]
Source: Australian Museum (Val Attenbrow)
Includes Aboriginal place names around Sydney Harbour and Botany Bay, Clan names and language groups
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Source: Ezreena Yahya / Honi Soit
General article about language revival across Australia, with special mention of Woolgoolga High School in North Coast NSW where all year 7 students learn Gumbaynggirr, and at Chifley College in Western Sydney where students can learn Darug; in both cases noting positive outcomes for Aboriginal students.
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Source: Australian National Dictionary Centre
Background information and list of words taken from Australian languages (including the Sydney language, Kamilaroi and others) into English and many other languages.
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Source: Dharug Dalang
Facebook Community page accompanying the Dharug Dalang website for learning the Dharug language.
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Source: Richard Green
A site developed by Richard Green, a Dharug songman, for teaching his language Dharug. Contains wordlists and phrases with audio, and a Dharug version of Advance Australia Fair,.
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Source: Richard Green / University of NSW
This website implements the teaching paradigm developed by Richard Green, a Dharug songman, for teaching his language. Includes vocab with audio pronunciations.
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Source: City of Ryde
Various historical evidence and perspectives on the life of Woollarawarre Bennelong. This page has a range of words used by the Port Jackson people (called here ‘Eora’, or ‘Darug-Eora’) - some are names of people, others are words from the language(s).
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Source: Al Jazeera
A detailed film report by Al Jazeera on the history of the destruction of Aboriginal languages, the story of those surviving, and the efforts of people to revive their languages. Features speakers of Darug (a particularly impressive contribution by Richard Green), Arrernte (John Cavenagh), Gumbaynggirr (Michael Jarrett), Pitjanatjara and others.
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Source: Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR), SOAS
William Dawes' notebooks of 1790-91 on the Sydney language (also known as Dharuk or Eora). High quality images; new interactive transcription with pop-up notes and concordance. Also includes information on Patyegarang, bibliography and links to other Sydney language resources, teaching programs, and audio in Dharug from Richard Green.
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Source: Richard Green
Richard Green, a Dharug community member and language teacher, has been instrumental in the reclamation of the Dharug language. In this paper, Richard describes his personal history and relationship to his language, his initiation of teaching it in schools, and about his teaching resources and methods.
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Source: ABC
An ABC film about reviving languages and the sometimes uneasy relationships between Aboriginal people and linguists. Hosted by Lorena Allam and with contributions from Richard Green (speaking Darug), Alkira Aldridge, Mal Fine, Rob Amery and John Hobson.
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Source: Richard Green
Richard, a teacher of Dharuk at Chifley College in Sydney, tells a story in Dharuk about the loss of country; and in English and Dharuk about the name of the language.
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Source: Jacinta Tobin / Sandra Lee
Welcome to Country (welcome to Macquarie University) performed by singer Jacinta Tobin and Sandra Lee, two elders from the Darug community of Sydney.
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Dhudhuroa [ddr]
Source: Barry J Blake / Julie Reid / VACL
Dhudhuroa, a language of northeast Victoria, was spoken by the Dyinningmiddhang tribe on the Mitta Mitta and Kiewa rivers, and along the Murray valley from Albury to Jingellic. Includes a descriptve grammar and a wordlist. See also the VACL page. [PDF 34 pages]
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Dhurga [dhu]
Source: New South Wales Government
See Learning from each school's experience for case studies from Broulee, Brewarrina, Forbes North, Hillston, Lightning Ridge, St Joseph's, Bourke, Bowraville, Dubbo, Lower Darling, Menindee, Parkes and Vincentia; many include students and teachers speaking or singing in language. [Classified under Dhurga althoug hthis is just one of many language represented]
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Source: Jonathan Hill
Essay in which the author describes the complex issues involved in teaching "a dead language". He advocates that every Australian student should learn an Aboriginal language.
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Dieri [dif]
Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: Mobile Language Team/University of Adelaide
Bibliogrpahy of online and other references and resources for Dieri.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
A blog set up to support the Dieri Aboriginal Corporation language revitalisation project. Includes many posts with language learning materials, explanations, recordings and texts, songs and comics.
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Dja Dja Wurrung [aus-x-djq]
Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Djangu [dhg]
Source: ARDS
A range of dictionaries for several Yol?u languages; also specialised English-Yol?u anatomy and legal dictionaries.
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Source: ARDS
Background information and 900-word dictionary of the Dha?u languages of Yol?u matha -- (Wangurri, G
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Source: ARDS
English wordlist for the Dha?u Dictionary.
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Djinang [dji]
Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Richard Birrinbirrin/YouTube
Richard Birrinbirrin speaks in Djinang about Djirrididi body painting and relates part of the Djan'kawu Sisters' story. Richard starred in the film Ten Canoes and is an artist, songman and community leader at Ramingining.
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Dyirbal [dbl]
Source: Luistxo Fernandez
Information, including placenames, for the languages: Guugu Yimithirr, Dyirbal, Gooniyandi, Arabana-Wangkangurru, Yagara and Yugambeh.
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Source: Jan Wohlgemuth
Discussion on Dyirbal grammatical and sociolinguistic topics, focusing on changes and decline over the last 30 years; in German and English.
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Eastern Arrernte [aer]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Eora [aus-x-eoq]
Source: Australian National Dictionary Centre
Background information and list of words taken from Australian languages (including the Sydney language, Kamilaroi and others) into English and many other languages.
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Source: City of Ryde
Various historical evidence and perspectives on the life of Woollarawarre Bennelong. This page has a range of words used by the Port Jackson people (called here ‘Eora’, or ‘Darug-Eora’) - some are names of people, others are words from the language(s).
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Gabi Gabi [gbw]
Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Ganai/Kurnai [unn]
Source: Woolum Bellum KODE school/CALC Multimedia/Victoria University of Technology
A CD-ROM project on Ganai (also known as Gunai or Kurnai) language and culture, featuring animated learning content, self-recording/playback facilities, interactive games, a dual language dictionary and Dreamtime stories.
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Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Source: Lynnette Solomon-Dent / Doris Paton / Hollie Johnson
A video about the revival of the Ganai (Kurnai) language of Gippsland, driven by three Ganai women who are teachers and academics. The video is also on Vimeo.
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Source: Lynnette Solomon-Dent / Doris Paton / Hollie Johnson / ABC
Video about the GunaiKurnai language of East Gippsland, Victoria, and revival work by Lynnette Solomon-Dent, Dr Doris Paton and Hollie Johnson.
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Source: VACL
Catalogue of books (dictionaries, stories etc), maps, CDs and more, covering a large number of Victorian languages. See also the Resources tab for further information and advice etc.
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Source: VACL
Information abput the Yirruk-Tinnor Gunnai/Kurnai Language Program which has been running for over 10 years. Includes animated Dreaming Story Borun & Tuk.
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Gathang [kda]
Source: First Voices/Gathang Language Group/Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative
A collaborative and community-based effort to provide online resources for Gathang, the language of the Birrbay, Guringay and Warrimay people. Contains a browsable and searchable wordlist, and some games.
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Source: Michael Smith
The Kutthung, or Kattang, dialect was spoken amongst the Australian Aborigines living along the southern bank of the Karuah river and the south shore of Port Stephens, New South Wales, Australia.
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Source: Jeremy Saunders
Jeremy Saunders talks about the importance of revitalising endangered languages, and his work teaching his own language Gathang..
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Gidja [gia]
Source: Frances Kofod / ELAR
Archive deposit: includes examples of Gija (east Kimberley) from up to 40 speakers with many painting stories from leading artists. A documentation of the knowledge of the natural and cultural world of the Gija, with a focus on the mythological, historical and ecological knowledge associated with sites depicted in the artists’ paintings, and the language used to describe paintings, dance and song performance. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Golpa [lja]
Source: Juliane Kabisch-Lindenlaub / ELAR
Archive deposit: resources for an annotated and illustrated Golpa (Elcho Island, NT) story book based on audio recordings made in the 1960s by B. Schebeck and more recent recordings by the depositor. The narrator of the older texts is the father of today's Golpa consultants. Narratives focus on a description of the languages used by different clans in the Ganba?tji area (comprising Elcho Island, Wessel Islands and Cape Wessels). Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Gooniyandi [gn]
Source: Luistxo Fernandez
Information, including placenames, for the languages: Guugu Yimithirr, Dyirbal, Gooniyandi, Arabana-Wangkangurru, Yagara and Yugambeh.
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Gudjal [aus-x-guq]
Source: State Library of Queensland
A set of interactive multimedia audio books for learning basic vocabulary of Queensland languages including Butchullla, Gudjal, Gunggari, and Yugambeh.
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Gumbaynggir [kgs]
Source: Ezreena Yahya / Honi Soit
General article about language revival across Australia, with special mention of Woolgoolga High School in North Coast NSW where all year 7 students learn Gumbaynggirr, and at Chifley College in Western Sydney where students can learn Darug; in both cases noting positive outcomes for Aboriginal students.
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Source: Gary Williams / Dallas Walker / ABC
In this film, Gary Williams and Dallas Walker introduce themselves and sing the song Baabaga Birruganba Bularri. The page also includes the written lyrics for the song.
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Source: ABC/Fiona Poole/Gary Williams
Background to Gumbaynggirr of north-coastal NSW. Gary Williams is a Gumbaynggirr language teacher at the Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative. Includes a list of over 100 words and phrases in Gumbaynggirr, many with audio pronunciation.
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Source: Al Jazeera
A detailed film report by Al Jazeera on the history of the destruction of Aboriginal languages, the story of those surviving, and the efforts of people to revive their languages. Features speakers of Darug (a particularly impressive contribution by Richard Green), Arrernte (John Cavenagh), Gumbaynggirr (Michael Jarrett), Pitjanatjara and others.
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Source: Muurrbay
Muurrbay was set up in 1986 to support Aboriginal people, particularly Gumbaynggirr, in the revival and maintenance of language and culture. It conducts a range of workshops and other activities including teacher training and language teaching in schools. See especially the Publications section for some fine reference books.
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Gun-nartpa [bvr]
Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Gunggari [kgl]
Source: State Library of Queensland
A set of interactive multimedia audio books for learning basic vocabulary of Queensland languages including Butchullla, Gudjal, Gunggari, and Yugambeh.
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Source: Ethel Munn / Faith Baisden / ABC
Ethel Munn with friends and colleagues sing a lullaby based on some treasured old sheet music.
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Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Gunwinygu [gup]
Source: Bininj Gunwok project
Bininj Gunwok refers to six mutually intelligible dialects stretching from Kakadu National Park south to Pine Creek and Manyallaluk, and east across the Arnhem Land plateau. This site has a wonderful array of information about Kunwinjku and related languages, including maps, texts, grammar, phrases with audio, publications, and photos. Notably, all the menus and much of the information is in Kunwinjku.
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Source: Murray Garde/Land Rights News
An account from Murray Garde about language misunderstandings between government representatives and Kunwinjku-speaking Bininj people about township leasing at Gunbalanya leading to serious misrepresentation of the wishes of the community and traditional owners.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Gupapuyngu [guf]
Source: ARDS
A range of dictionaries for several Yol?u languages; also specialised English-Yol?u anatomy and legal dictionaries.
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Source: Glottolog
Glottolog’s resource page for Gupapuyngu, a Yolngu language of NT. The page shows Gupapuyngu’s location on a map, its place within its language family, and a large number of references for the language (most are harvested from bibliographic sources and the items are not necessarily online). See also the main Glottolog page.
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Source: Yolngu people / Yasunori Hayashi
Site with a range of information about Yolngu culture, language, placenames, and about 30 songs. The whole site may be viewed in Yolngu matha, English, or Japanese. Note: the media may require browser plugins.
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Gurindji [gue]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Gurindji Kriol [aus-x-gkq]
Source: Felicity Meakins / ELAR
Archive deposit: audio and video recordings of Gurindji Kriol, which fuses Gurindji with Kriol. It is an important language for younger Gurindji people, and is significant linguistically, with a rarely-observed mixed structure. Gurindji Kriol is increasingly being replaced by Kriol among Gurindji teenagers. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Guugu Yimithirr [kky]
Source: Luistxo Fernandez
Information, including placenames, for the languages: Guugu Yimithirr, Dyirbal, Gooniyandi, Arabana-Wangkangurru, Yagara and Yugambeh.
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Iwaidja [ibd]
Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: RNLD
A list of some mobile apps for Indigenous languages, including Anindilyakwa, Gamilaraay, Iwaidja, Nyoongar, Yawuru, and Yugambeh. Most are basic wordlists.
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Source: Iwaidja Inyman
A community project based on Croker Island which documents, maintains, preserves and promotes Iwaidja and other endangered languages of the local region (Amurdak, Marrku). Has a great range of books in/about languages, music, photos, phone app, and videos in languages.
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Source: Joy Williams Malwagag and Sabina Hoeng
A short film where senior Iwaidja speaker Ngalwangardi aju Minjilang (1946-2012) talks in Iwaidja about the pressure on her language. She describes consequences of the 2009 policy of the Northern Territory Department of Education and Training to marginalize the use of indigenous languages in schools.
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Source: Noreen Pym and Bonnie Larrimore/AuSIL
Dictionary consists of approximately 1600 headwords. Iwaidja is spoken by around 150 people on Croker Island and the Cobourg Peninsula in Western Arnhem Land.
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Source: Iwaidja Inyman
A site for sharing information about Iwaidja issues and language. Has some nice illustrated wordlists for plants and birds.
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Jagera/Yuragubul [yxg]
Source: Luistxo Fernandez
Information, including placenames, for the languages: Guugu Yimithirr, Dyirbal, Gooniyandi, Arabana-Wangkangurru, Yagara and Yugambeh.
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Jandai [jan]
Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Jaru [ddj]
Source: Mirima Dawang Woorlab-gerring Language and Culture Centre and Kimberley Language Resource Centre
Provides NAATI-accredited interpreters for Jaru, Kriol, Kija, Walmajarri and Kukatja languages. Interpreters are trained in areas such as law, health, social work, land claims, government, community affairs, business, tourism.
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Source: Goolarri Media/May Minyingali Butcher/Barbara Sturt/Kimberley Language Resource Centre/others
An oral history in Jaru told through a ‘walking story’, remembered by May Butcher who travelled hundreds of kilometres as a child to visit her sister at Moola Bulla mission
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Jiwarli [mem]
Source: Peter K. Austin
General information, references and short story with audio, for Jiwarli. There is also a short dictionary sample with the promise of a comprehensive online dictionary.
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Source: Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Dictionary, finderlist and topical index. Revised version of Peter Austin’ 1992 dictionary.
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Source: Dept Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Introduction to the Jiwarli language, culture and region of NW Western Australia: about Mr Jack Butler, the last native speaker of Jiwarli; photos, maps, texts, hear spoken Jiwarli etc.

This site is no longer live but is held in the NLA's Pandaora archive.

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Source: Peter K. Austin
An outline of Jiwarli's relationships to other languages and its formal linguistic characteristics.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
Slides from Peter’s LSA Summer Institute course on Jiwarli, covering its social and historical contexts, kinship, fieldwork, corpus, language typology, phonology, morphology and syntax.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
Paper arguing that in Jiwarli and related languages, word order serves pragmatic purposes in organising discourse, while the morphological shapes of words signal grammatical functions and anaphoric relations.
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Juwaliny [wmt]
Source: Sally Dixon/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Dictionary, finderlist and topical index, in a graphical hypertext/interactive format (using Flash).
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Kaanju [kbe]
Source: Clair Hill / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula. Includes audio, video, texts and dictionary. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Kala Lagaw Ya [mwp]
Source: ABC
A version of the I Still Call Australia Home ad (from Qantas) which features 13 year old Torres Strait Islander Tyus Arndt singing the first verse in Kala Lagaw Ya (western Torres Strait).
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Kamilaroi/Gamilaraay [kld]
Source: Australian National Dictionary Centre
Background information and list of words taken from Australian languages (including the Sydney language, Kamilaroi and others) into English and many other languages.
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Source: Brooke Ferguson / John Giacon / Clare Manning / Elena Mujkic
Regularly updated blog for Gamilaraay teaching, language resources, and items of general interest such as songs, photos, video etc.. See also the main Gamilaraay/Yuwaalaraay website.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
An outline of the history of the research on the Gamilaraay language with a focus on some of the people who have contributed to its documentation from the 1830s to today.
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Source: Peter Austin and David Nathan
Kamilaroi/Gamilaraay comes from northern NSW, from around Tamworth west across beyond Moree. This is the first formatted hypertext dictionary published on the Internet.
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Source: John Giacon and David Nathan
Interactive multimedia resource for Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay. Includes searchable dictionary with over 2,600 entries, all including audio; 1000 spoken sentences, all transcribed, and linked to the dictionary; 44 songs and stories, all transcribed, and linked to the dictionary; various games.

Free registration and download (Windows only).

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Source: William Ridley/Project Gutenburg
Ridley's 1856 volume available in plain text form.
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Source: RNLD
A list of some mobile apps for Indigenous languages, including Anindilyakwa, Gamilaraay, Iwaidja, Nyoongar, Yawuru, and Yugambeh. Most are basic wordlists.
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Source: John Giacon / LDC
A paper considering linguists’ roles, methods, and principles in language revival, largely based on John’s experience with Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay.
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Source: André Bosch
André Bosch created and recited this Gamilaraay version of ‘Waltzing Matilda’.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
A downloadable academic grammar, complied from historical sources, with introduction to the people and language, and notes on the closely related Yuwaalaraay and Yuwaaliyaay languages. Published 1993.
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Source: University of Sydney
This unit of study will provide students with a basic competence in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Gamilaraay sufficient to recognise and construct simple utterances in the language, and to understand its relationships with other languages.
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Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Source: Yuwaalaraay Language Program/John Giacon
Dictionaries and a range of links and learning materials for Yuwaalaraay and Gamilaraay.
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Karajarri [gbd]
Source:
Characters include Dianne Appleby, a linguist and speaker of the two languages of her parents - Karrajarri and Yawuru. Dianne regularly performs Welcome to Country ceremonies and was instrumental in establishing Yawuru language classes at the Cable Beach Primary School.
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Source: Mervyn Mulardy Snr
Mervyn tells about his background and life, in Karajarri.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Kaurna [zku]
Source: ABC
Transcript of article about Kaurna "being spoken as a result of a joint effort by black and white Australians to revive what had been considered by many to be a dead language" [ABC 7.30 Report 28/02/01].
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Source: Jack Buckskin
Kaurna teacher Jack Buckskin explains some basic words and expressions of Kaurna.
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Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: Kaurna Warra Pintyanthi
Video showing some of the animals of the Adelaide region and their Kaurna names.
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Source: Kaurna Warra Pintyanthi / ABC
This film teaches Kaurna numbers from 1 to 10. See also Kaurna for Kids - Animals and Common (Kaurna) Expressions.
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Source: School of Languages, SA
Kaurna is the original language of the Adelaide Plains. These courses (Stages 1 & 2) focus on developing communication skills in Kaurna (speaking, listening, reading & writing), developing understanding of language as a system and enhancing intercultural understanding.
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Source: Kaurna Warra Pintyandi and the Land Services Group
The Kaurna Place Names project aims to identify and map places with Kaurna names and to encourage the use and increase knowledge of these names.Includes, maps, language information, and audio of spoken introduction.
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Source: University of Adelaide
Kaurna language and linguistics courses at Adelaide Uni. Other resources include placenames, wordlists (passworded), Kaurna language information and links. Welcome page includes spoken welcome in Kaurna by Uncle Lewis Yerloburka O'Brien.
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Source: University of Adelaide
Courses in the Kaurna language taught at the University of Adelaide and Salisbury High School (teacher: Jack Kanya Buckskin). The site is also "the Internet home of Kaurna Warra, the language of the people of the Adelaide Plain", with information about the language, language projects and resources, place names, news and events.
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Source: Kaurna Warra Karrpanthi Aboriginal Corporation
A language organisation supporting the Kaurna language. Ths site contains links to language resources, wordlists, maps, courses, placenames, language requests, and audio versions of Welcome to Country.
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Source: South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability
Curriculum for Reception to Year 10 students, focusing on language learning and language custodianship, history, and revival, with specific materials for Kaurna, Narungga, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu and Yankunytjatjara.
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Source: Kaurna Warra Pityandi/University of Adelaide
Summer school at the University of Adelaide: Summer School, 14th-25th January 2013.
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Source: ABC
An ABC film about reviving languages and the sometimes uneasy relationships between Aboriginal people and linguists. Hosted by Lorena Allam and with contributions from Richard Green (speaking Darug), Alkira Aldridge, Mal Fine, Rob Amery and John Hobson.
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Source: ABC
In this episode of the ABC’s Awaye!, Kaurna speaker Jack Buckskin and other linguists describe the teaching and revitalisation of Kaurna, the language of the Adeliade plains.
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Source: Rob Amery & Vincent (Jack) Kanya Buckskin
Rob and Vincent's course at inField 2010. Based on ideas and strategies for re-introducing the "sleeping" language Kaurna to a range of learners in a context in which the teachers are themselves learning the language. Several PPT resources on Kaurna names, greetings, songs etc.
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Source: Rob Amery
Rob
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Kayardild [gyd]
Source: Erich Round / ELAR
Archive deposit: audio, video, ELAN transcription files, and summary metadata on the Kayardild language spoken on Bentinck and Mornington Islands. Comprises recorded and documented texts, elicitation sessions, and traditional food gathering activities by the last speakers well versed in traditional knowledge. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Kaytetye [gbb]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Koko-Bera [kkp]
Source: Alice Gaby / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula including Kuuk Thaayorre, Wik Yi’anh, Kugu Muminh, Koko Bera, and Wik Mungkan. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Kriol and pidgins [rop]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Felicity Meakins / Waleed Aly / ABC
In this interview by Waleed Aly, Felicity Meakins describes Kriol, a language spoken by about 20,000 people across northern Australia. It has regional varieties, such as Gurindji Kriol described in this interview.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: Ali Mills / Skinnyfish Music
A version of Waltzing Matilda sung in Kriol.
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Kugu-Muminh [xmh]
Source: Alice Gaby / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula including Kuuk Thaayorre, Wik Yi’anh, Kugu Muminh, Koko Bera, and Wik Mungkan. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Kukatja [kux]
Source: ABC/Willi Lempert
Five women elders from the Kapululangu Women’s Law and Culture Centre explain over 40 hand signs and translate them into Kukatja.
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Kuku Thaypan [typ]
Source: Bruce Rigsby / ELAR
Archive deposit: an Awu Alaya Dictionary in Toolbox (text) format, along with scans of original fieldwork notebooks. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Kuku Yalanji [gvn]
Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Kurrama [vku]
Source: ABC/WAM
The album Sounds of the Pilbara - Songs in Language includes songs in many of the endangered languages of the Pilbara region of WA. See also the main site at WAM (Western Australian Music and listen directly here via Soundcloud.
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Kuuk Thaayorre [thd]
Source: Alice Gaby / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula including Kuuk Thaayorre, Wik Yi’anh, Kugu Muminh, Koko Bera, and Wik Mungkan. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Kuuku Ya’u [kuy]
Source: Clair Hill / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula. Includes audio, video, texts and dictionary. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Lardil [lbz]
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Linngithigh [lnj]
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Luritja/Pintupi [piu]
Source: Dan Harrison, Ted Egan, children from Killara School (Sydney) and Ntaria School (Hermannsburg)
The Australian National Anthem translated into Luritja by Alison Nararula Anderson and Ted Egan, and sung by children from Sydney's Killara School and Ntaria School in Hermannsburg. See also the SMH article for more audio of learning the song and background story, and the article at Alice Online.
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Source: PAW media
IndigiTUBE channel for accessing PAW content. Easy access to over 80 songs from the PAW communities and in the PAW languages
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Source: United Nations High Commission for Human Rights/ANU/L. Macdonald/S.J Dixon/S. Holcombe/K. Hansen
A translation of the Declaration of Human Rights into Pintupi/Luritja, the first in an Australian language. See news articles from ANU and the ABC. The translation is also available at from ANU. (See also the English version.)
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Malyangapa [yga]
Source: Peter Austin
Using intensively annotated data from Malyangapa, the paper describes the implementation of a database model in Shoebox to provide a hypertext exploration environment. [In order to download the paper you may need to set up a (free) account with academia.edu.]
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Source: Luise Hercus and Peter K. Austin
The authors propose a Yarli language subgroup consisting of Malyangapa, Wadikali, and Yardliyawara. These languages were spoken in the far north-west corner of New South Wales and adjacent areas in South Australia and Queensland.
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Manyjilyjarra [mpj]
Source: Sue Hanson/Albert Burgman/James Marsh/Joshua Booth/Others/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Dictionary, finderlist and topical index.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Martu Wangka [mpj]
Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: James Marsh/Albert Burgman/Others/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Dictionary, finderlist and topical index, with many audio examples.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Source: Bernice Samson/Tanya Charles/Darilyn Samson/Dannielle Booth/Thiona Samson/Tenielle Taylor/Andrea Peterson
A filmed short story in Martu language about a spirit woman Yarrarni who waits in the bush near Jigalong to lure unsuspecting travellers.
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Martuthunira [vma]
Source: Alan Dench
A facsimile version of the Martuthunira grammar as a set of linked PDF files. The Table of Contents, Index entries, and cross references to the grammar, the bibliography, and language examples are links allowing easy navigation. Published as Pacific Linguistics C:125.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Mawng [mph]
Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Ruth Singer / ELAR
Archive deposit: focussed on dictionary definitions of triangular kinship terms and names for flora and fauna and associated knowledge. The deposit also includes audio recordings of myths and stories about traditional customs. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols, and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Ruth Singer/Mawng Ngaralk/Storytellers
A revised Mawng-English dictionary, information about the Mawng language spoken on Warruwi (South Goulbourn Island), and many videos and sound recordings of stories told by Mawng speakers.
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Source: Ruth Singer/Isabel O’Keefe/Elizabeth Langslow/Janet Mardbinda/others
Mawng-English dictionary (as online interactive or as downloadable PDF, together with English-Mawng finderlist), together with many video and audio stories videos and sound recordings. Also some downladable posters on fish, shells and plant medicine.
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Source: Sam Hellmuth, Frank Kügler & Ruth Singer
Descriptive and theoretical results of a corpus-based phonetic study of pitch accent in Mawng (Goulburn Islands, NT).
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Mbarrumbathama [lby]
Source: Jean-Christophe Verstraete
Archive deposit: audio and video recordings, with transcriptions, of texts, lexical and grammatical elicitation. Recordings were made with Mrs Florrie Bassani, Mr Bobby Stewart and Mrs Daisy Stewart. Represents languages Umpithamu, Morrobolam (also known as Umbuygamu), and Mbarrumbathama (also known as Lamalama). Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor
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Meriam Mir [ulk]
Source: National Library of Australia
Manuscript Collection of the National Library of Australia: contains text written in Mr Mabo's language Meriam Mir.
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Miriwoong [mep]
Source: Mirima Council
Website describing the range of activities of the Mirima Dawang Woorlab-gerring Language Centre, including the Miriwoong Language Nest, language classes, and language documentation and research. See also the Seasonal calendar.
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Source: Mirima Council
Mirima Dawang Woorlab-gerring’s beautiful and detailed interactive page describing Miriwoong traditional weather knowledge by connecting the calendar to seasons, weather, country, plants and animals. Make sure to watch the video first ("Play movie" button).
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Morrobolam [umg]
Source: Jean-Christophe Verstraete
Archive deposit: audio and video recordings, with transcriptions, of texts, lexical and grammatical elicitation. Recordings were made with Mrs Florrie Bassani, Mr Bobby Stewart and Mrs Daisy Stewart. Represents languages Umpithamu, Morrobolam (also known as Umbuygamu), and Mbarrumbathama (also known as Lamalama). Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor
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Murrinh-Patha [mwf]
Source: Rachel Nordlinger/University of Melbourne
Rachel gives a background to Australian languages and her research on languages at Wadeye (YouTube audio).
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: Lysbeth Ford and Dominic McCormack
The Glossary shows non-Murrinhpatha speakers (including judges, lawyers, police etc) how English legal terms are rendered in Murrinhpatha. It is also a tool for Murrinhpatha legal interpreters and the people of the Thamarrurr region. Written in in collaboration with Wadeye elders Frank Dumoo and Claude Narjic, it is based on earlier work by Michael Walsh and Chester Street. See also this associated paper.
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Source: School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Rachel's page contains links to papers on the syntax of Aboriginal languages, including a grammar and learner's guide for Wambaya, and several papers on Murrinh-Patha
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Source: Wadeye Aboriginal Community, NT
Clan names and their languages at Wadeye (Port Keats).
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Source: Linda Barwick/Allan Marett/Michael Walsh/Joe Blythe/Nick Reid/Lysbeth Ford
This site documents the history, language and music of public songs and dances composed and performed at Wadeye, NT (aka Port Keats). You can search the database, listen to songs and see information about the singers, translations, and other musicological documentation. Some of the recordings are for community access only or are not publicly available, but you can apply for access. See also the Murrinh-Patha song project description.
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Narigu/Ngarigo [aus-x-ngq]
Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Narrungga [nnr]
Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: Mobile Language team / University of Adelaide
This page consists of a bibliography of about 35 language resources for Narrunga, from the early 19th century until now.
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Source: South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability
Curriculum for Reception to Year 10 students, focusing on language learning and language custodianship, history, and revival, with specific materials for Kaurna, Narungga, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu and Yankunytjatjara.
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Nauo [now]
Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Ndjebbana [djj]
Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Source: Glenn Auld
Application of computer assisted learning among the Kunibidji, focusing on the use of electronic talking books in Ndjébbana displayed on touch-screens, to look at the potential for language learning and cultural understanding.
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Ngaanyatjarra [ntj]
Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: NPY Women
This page hosts a downlodable PDF document called Uti Kulintjaku: A compendium of words for talking about mental health. It includes terms in Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra, as well as translations from English into these languages.
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Ngadjon [dbl]
Source: J.Hartley, M. Huxley and the Elders of the Ngadjon-jii
The Ngadjon-jii: The original inhabitants of the rainforest country around Malanda in Far North Queensland.
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Ngarluma [nrl]
Source: Alison Kohn
A formal description of the linguistic morphology of Ngarluma [PDF, 77 pages]
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Source: Sally Dixon et al (see acknowledgements)/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Dictionary, finderlist and topical index, in a graphical hypertext/interactive format (using Flash). See also Ngarluma Morphological Description by Allison Kohn.
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Source: ABC/WAM
The album Sounds of the Pilbara - Songs in Language includes songs in many of the endangered languages of the Pilbara region of WA. See also the main site at WAM (Western Australian Music and listen directly here via Soundcloud.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Ngarrindjeri [nay]
Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability
Curriculum for Reception to Year 10 students, focusing on language learning and language custodianship, history, and revival, with specific materials for Kaurna, Narungga, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu and Yankunytjatjara.
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Ngunawal [xul]
Source: AIATSIS
Ngunawal is now being taught in a pilot program at Fraser Primary School, the result of a joint effort between Ngunawal community members and linguists from AIATSIS. The program has developed a writing system and sets of resources for teaching Ngunawal.
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Noongar [nys]
Source:
The school hosts the "Noongar Language and Djidi Marlak Cultural Program" where all classes from K to 6 take Noongar language and cultural lessons. Language teachers have developed songs, games, books and teaching resources specific to the local area. Staff also take Noongar lessons and the language is integrated into other learning areas.
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Source: RNLD
A list of some mobile apps for Indigenous languages, including Anindilyakwa, Gamilaraay, Iwaidja, Nyoongar, Yawuru, and Yugambeh. Most are basic wordlists.
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Source: South West Aboriginal Land & Sea Council
This site contains a wealth of language and cultural materials and references to Noongar resources. Its language page links to a a wordlist, a full Noongar Dictionary by Rose Whitehurst, and an audio Welcome to Country performance.
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Source: Noongar Boodjar Waangkiny / Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
The Language Centre aims to act as a peak body for Noongar language and dialects, develop language learning resources for all Noongar clan groups, to record, document and publish Noongar traditional stories, and more. The website contains information about Noongar dialects, has a Welcome to Country text, and offers books for sale.
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Source: YouTube: jo76nyoongar
... ‘Critically endangered language; less than 5 fluent speaker of population of 45,000 Nyoongar people.’ YouTube video with background information as voice-over in Nyoongar languages (and a little Gurrumul song in Yolngu thrown in too).
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Source: Cath Trimboli
TV-based (on NITV) language learning resources for young children learning Noongar. Click on links to find out about episodes. Search the web for samples on YouTube etc and DVDs for sale.
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Source: Clint Bracknell
Four original story books in Noongar. You can listen to the audio of the stories here. see also a video version on the main page.
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Source: Yirra Yaakin Theatre Company
In a world first, Aboriginal actors performed Shakespeare in the Noongar language. Yirra Yaakin was invited by the Globe Theatre to translate Shakespeare's sonnets into Noongar and present them on the Globe stage as part of the 2012 Cultural Olympiad Festival.
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Nunggubuyu [nuy]
Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Nyamal [nly]
Source: Biddy Norman/Dann Murphy/Teddy Allen/Alice Mitchell/Linda Mitchell/Geoff O
Hypertext/interactive dictionary, finderlist and topical index.
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Source: ABC/WAM
The album Sounds of the Pilbara - Songs in Language includes songs in many of the endangered languages of the Pilbara region of WA. See also the main site at WAM (Western Australian Music and listen directly here via Soundcloud.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Nyangumarta [nna]
Source: Geoffrey O'Grady/Albert Burgman/Others/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Grammatical description, dictionary, finderlist and topical index.
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Source: ABC/WAM
The album Sounds of the Pilbara - Songs in Language includes songs in many of the endangered languages of the Pilbara region of WA. See also the main site at WAM (Western Australian Music and listen directly here via Soundcloud.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Nyikina [nyh]
Source:
The Madjulla website has information about the film Three Sisters: Women of High Degree, with much of the dialogue in Nyikina, and describes the efforts of Nyikina women and others to protect their language, culture and Kimberley environment. See also this article on Nyikina language developments by Dr Anne Poelina.
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Nyiyaparli [nad]
Source: ABC/WAM
The album Sounds of the Pilbara - Songs in Language includes songs in many of the endangered languages of the Pilbara region of WA. See also the main site at WAM (Western Australian Music and listen directly here via Soundcloud.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Paakantyi [drl]
Source: AIATSIS Library
Classical and comprehensive bibliography of books, serials and some electronic materials held by AIATSIS on the Paakantyi language. See also all AIATSIS language and people bibliographies.
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Pakanh [pkn]
Source: Philip Hamilton
Pakanh is a Cape York language. Includes multimedia annotations.
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Palawa Kani [xtz]
Source: Alison Overeem / ABC
Alison Overeem is interviewed about Palawa kani or ‘ Tassie blackfella talk’ and how her community teaches and uses the language today. Includes a wordlist with over 100 words.
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Source: ABC/Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery
Historical and unique wax cylinder recordings from 1903 of Fanny Cochrane Smith, Tasmanian Aboriginal woman, and information about Fanny and her life. hese are some of the earliest recordings ever made in Australia, and the only audio recording of the Tasmanian Aboriginal language.
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Source: ABC
Tasmanian singer-songwriter Dewayne Everettsmith released an album including the first commercial song in Palawa kani. The song Melaythina was written by Aboriginal community members. It is about welcoming to country, welcoming Palawa people and the broader community, and refers to places such as Kunanyi (Mount Wellington).
See Dewayne Everettsmith performing the song on the Tasmanian Museum and art Gallery site or on YouTube.
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Source: Andy Baird / Tasmanian Museum and art Gallery
A guide for middle and secondary school students and teachers visiting ningenneh tunapry, the Tasmanian Aboriginal exhibition at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. The document contains some vocabulary and a range of historical and cultural information. [PDF, 20 pages]
See also Dewayne Everettsmith singing a song in palawa kani.
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Source: ABC
A story about Aboriginal singer-songwriting duo Stiff Gins choosing to record on Edison wax cylinder, inspired by a song recording of Tasmanian Aboriginal woman Fanny Cochrane Smith in 1903. This page includes part of that recording, the only known recording of a Tasmanian Aboriginal language. See also Fanny Cochrane Smith recordings: 1899 and 1903 for further information.
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Pitjantjatjara [pjt]
Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: Ngapartji Ngapartji
A result of the Pitjantjatjara art-language project Ngapartji Ngapartji that was run on Arrernte country in Mparntwe (Alice Springs).

See also site at http://ninti.ngapartji.org/, where you can register for free and take 20 simple language lessons.

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Source: Ngapartji Ngapartji project
Ngapartji Ngapartji was an arts based community development project. Its website has a useful section on language including a link to this background and policy paper on support of languages [PDF, 5 pages]
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Source: Wilfried Baumgarten
Two short articles on Pitjantjatjara demonstratives and transitivity
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Source: University of South Australia
Aims to develop basic understanding of Pitjantjatjara language and culture through various topics including the concept of Ngapartji and reciprocal exchange; Pitjantjatjara vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and translation; and interaction with fluent speakers.
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Source: University of South Australia
Consisting of oral practice, elementary vocabulary, basic grammar and written exercises the School will be conducted with sessions of role play with an emphasis on oral fluency, small group sessions for revision and practice or oral language and grammar sessions
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Source: South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability
Curriculum for Reception to Year 10 students, focusing on language learning and language custodianship, history, and revival, with specific materials for Kaurna, Narungga, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu and Yankunytjatjara.
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Source: Robin Kankapakantja/Alexander Dunton/Fregon Anangu School/others
Tjina Ankula Kulini Ara Irititja -- Walking along thinking about the past. In September 2011 a group of 12 young men and 13 elders from Fregon travelled for 3 days. this is a musical, film, photographic and poetic record of their journey.
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Source: NPY Women
This page hosts a downlodable PDF document called Uti Kulintjaku: A compendium of words for talking about mental health. It includes terms in Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra, as well as translations from English into these languages.
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Source: Ara Irititja Project
Ara Irititja brings back home materials of cultural and historical significance to Anangu (Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara people of Central Australia). These include photographs, films, sound recordings and documents. Ara Irititja has designed a digital archive to store repatriated materials and other contemporary items.
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Pitta Pitta [pit]
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Putijarra [mpj]
Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Sign languages [aus-x-siq]
Source: Clifton Jungurrayi Bieundurry
In this film, Clifton Jungurrayi Bieundurry, Walmajarri artist from Wangkajungka, shows and explain some handsigns used by his people.
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Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Source: ABC/Willi Lempert
Five women elders from the Kapululangu Women’s Law and Culture Centre explain over 40 hand signs and translate them into Kukatja.
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Sydney language [aus-x-syq]
Source: Australian National Dictionary Centre
Background information and list of words taken from Australian languages (including the Sydney language, Kamilaroi and others) into English and many other languages.
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Source: City of Ryde
Various historical evidence and perspectives on the life of Woollarawarre Bennelong. This page has a range of words used by the Port Jackson people (called here ‘Eora’, or ‘Darug-Eora’) - some are names of people, others are words from the language(s).
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Source: Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR), SOAS
William Dawes' notebooks of 1790-91 on the Sydney language (also known as Dharuk or Eora). High quality images; new interactive transcription with pop-up notes and concordance. Also includes information on Patyegarang, bibliography and links to other Sydney language resources, teaching programs, and audio in Dharug from Richard Green.
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Source: Richard Green
Richard, a teacher of Dharuk at Chifley College in Sydney, tells a story in Dharuk about the loss of country; and in English and Dharuk about the name of the language.
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Taungurung [dgw]
Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Source: VACL
Catalogue of books (dictionaries, stories etc), maps, CDs and more, covering a large number of Victorian languages. See also the Resources tab for further information and advice etc.
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Thalanyji [dhl]
Source: Peter Austin/Rosie Campbell/Laura Hicks/Valerie Ashburton/Judy Hughes/Others/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Hypertext/interactive dictionary, finderlist and topical index.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Tiwi [tiw]
Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: ABC/Andrew Denton
Interview with Ted Egan, the Administrator of the Northern Territory. Ted speaks about how he learnt Tiwi from Aloysius Puantulura. Is Ted the first non-Aboriginal executive to speak an Australian language? (Sir Douglas Nicholls was the Aboriginal Governor of South Australia and was a "Dja Dja Wurrung, Wotjoboluk, and Yupagalk man" [http://www.vaeai.org.au/timeline/1901.html]).
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Source: Ngarukuruwala
A new Tiwi song created by the elders and children of the Tiwi Islands (YouTube video).
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Source: The Wangatunga Strong Women’s Group/Genevieve Campbell/Teresita Puruntatameri
A website of Tiwi songs. You can hear songs on the MP3 jukebox, read about the singers, their songs, crafts, and their community at Wurrumiyanga, Bathurst Island.
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Source: Jenny Lee/AuSIL
Dictionary consists of approximately 5000 headwords. Tiwi is spoken by approximately 1500 speakers on Bathurst and Melville Islands.
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Tjapukai [dyy]
Source: Tjapukai Aboriginal Cultural Park:
A few Tjapukai language activities are linked here - there was more language content on this site in the past, but it is currently being updated.
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Umpila [ump]
Source: Clair Hill / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula. Includes audio, video, texts and dictionary. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Umpithamu [umd]
Source: Jean-Christophe Verstraete
Archive deposit: audio and video recordings, with transcriptions, of texts, lexical and grammatical elicitation. Recordings were made with Mrs Florrie Bassani, Mr Bobby Stewart and Mrs Daisy Stewart. Represents languages Umpithamu, Morrobolam (also known as Umbuygamu), and Mbarrumbathama (also known as Lamalama). Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor
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Uw Oykangand [kjn]
Source: Philip Hamilton
Uw Oykangand and Uw Olkola are Australian Aboriginal languages spoken in central Cape York Peninsula in far north Queensland. This dictionary is a community-based initiative of the Kowanyama Aboriginal Community Council.
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Wagiman [waq]
Source: Wikipedia
A Wikipedia article on the Wagiman language. Wikipedia has an increasing number of pages on Indigenous languages. They can be useful sources, but vary greatly in quality and tend to be rather oriented toward technical linguistic description. This Wagiman page is one of the most comprehensive of them.
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Source: Stephen Wilson, University of Sydney
Comprehensive dictionary, texts, and other information about Wagiman, a language of the Northern Territory. Searchable in English and Wagiman.
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Wajarri [wbv]
Source: Rosalie Jones / ABC
In this film, Rosalie Jones, language consultant, cooks Marlu guga (kangaroo meat) and some Damba (damper), explaining some words of the Wajarri language.
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Source: Rosie Sitorus/Crikey
Linguist Rosie Sitorus provides an introduction to the languages and peoples of the midwest, Murchison and Gascoyne regions of Western Australia. An item from ,a href="http://blogs.crikey.com.au/fullysic/">Fully (sic), Crikey's language blog, which features several posts on Australian languages.
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Source: Leeann Merrit / ABC
In this short video Leeann Merrit teaches body parts in the Wajarri language.
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Wakka Wakka [wkw]
Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Walmajarri [wmt]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Clifton Jungurrayi Bieundurry
In this film, Clifton Jungurrayi Bieundurry, Walmajarri artist from Wangkajungka, shows and explain some handsigns used by his people.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Source: Jesse Moora / Eirlys Richards / Bernadette Trench-Thiedeman / Marsha Cook / Chantelle Berringal
In this video Jesse explains in Walmajarri about how she used to catch and cook jarrampa (fresh water prawns).
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Source: Eirlys Richards and Joyce Hudson
Dictionary based on the Walmajarri-English dictionary compiled from materials Eirlys Richards and Joyce Hudson gathered in and around Fitzroy Crossing between 1967 and 1984.
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Wambaya [wmb]
Source: School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Rachel's page contains links to papers on the syntax of Aboriginal languages, including a grammar and learner's guide for Wambaya, and several papers on Murrinh-Patha
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Wangkatha [pti]
Source: Josie Boyle
Josie Boyle sings in "wongutha lingo" (YouTube audio).
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Wanyjirra [aus-x-waq]
Source: Chikako Senge / ELAR
Archive deposit: descriptions and documentation of Wanyjirra mainly from two speakers and their families. Project goals are to make materials available to community members and to complete a reference grammar of Wanyjirra. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Warlpiri [wbp]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: ABC
Four Corners documentary about effects of government's scrapping of bilingual education in the NT.
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Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Source: ABC / Aboriginal Interpreter Service
The ABC, with the help of the Aboriginal Interpreter Service (NT), is trialling an Indigenous language News Service in Warlpiri and Yolngu Matha. Two ABC news bulletins are recorded each weekday. The daily bulletins can be heard on this page, with recent bulletins on SoundCloud, and on some Indigenous radio stations.
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Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Source: PAW Media/Jason Japaljarri Woods/students from Yuendumu School
An animated story book used as a Warlpiri literacy resource for young children at Yuendumu School.
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Source: Kevin Jansz, Christopher Manning, and Nitin Indurkhya
A unique graphical-browsing semantic dictionary aimed at the needs of native speakers and children, as well as being useful to professional linguists.
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Source: PAW Media/Henry Jakamarra Cook
Innovative storytelling using video and animation. It tells about when Warlpiri came across a European camp and found alternative uses for their tents. Animated by Jason Japaljarri Woods using sand drawing, clay and found objects.
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Source: PAW Media/June Napanangka Granites/Jason Japaljarri Woods
An animated short story about Sitting in the humpy during the rain.
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Source: Warlpiri Media Association
Website for the "Bush Mechanics" TV series. Includes games and videos, some in the Warlpiri language. Information on how to obtain the excellent "Bush Mechanics" videos.
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Source: PAW media
IndigiTUBE channel for accessing PAW content. Easy access to over 80 songs from the PAW communities and in the PAW languages
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Source: Carmel O'Shannessy / ELAR
Archive deposit: six traditional Warlpiri love songs, called yilpinji, sung by Teddy Morrison Jupurrurla, and two ceremonial initiation songs, sung by Peter Dixon Japanangka and a group of elder men. Includes transcribed and translated video and audio files.
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Source: PAW media/Alice Nampijinpa Hanwood/Margaret Napangardi Brown/Norbert Japaljarri Morris/Micah Japanangka Williams
Innovative storytelling using video and animation. The story is an Emu Dreaming from Nyirripi.
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Source: PAW media/Neville "Cobra" Japangardi Poulson/Jason Japaljarri Woods
An animated story explaining how crows, which were once white, came to be black.
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Source: David Nash
Resources and links for Warlpiri.The most comprehensive web resource for any single Australian language. See also David Nash's Home Page.
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Source: Steve Swartz/AuSIL
Warlpiri is spoken by about 3000 people in the Tanami Desert area. See also the About Warlpiri page for background to the dictionary.
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Source: PAW Media/Kathy Nangala Sampson/Jeannie Nampijimpa Presley/Maggie Napangardi Williams/Marissa Nangala Brown/Renita Napanangka McCormack/Danielle Napaljarri Colli
An animated story told by senior Willowra women at a place nearby the Willowra community. It tells the story of a Bush Turkey that travels around in search of women.
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Warnman [wbt]
Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Source: Nicholas Thieberger/Pijuka Eidwun/Minyawu Miller/Desmond Taylor/Muuki Taylor/Waka Taylor/Others/Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Languages Centre
Dictionary, finderlist and topical index. See the Acknowledgements and Copyright tab for the full list of many contributors.
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Warrgamay [wgy]
Source: Uncle Bill / ABC
A film where Uncle Bill explains why a swimming hole is special for him, his family and his people and teaches Warrgamay language along the way.
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Warrungu [wrg]
Source: Tasaku Tsunoda
A short report of Professor Tsunoda's experience in the preservation and revival of the Warrungu language of the Upper Herbert River area of north Queensland.
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Source: Alf Palmer/Tasaku Tsunoda/David Nathan
Stories, with sound, and interactive concordance of Alf Palmer's spoken material in Warrungu, the Aboriginal language of the Upper Herbert River area of north Queensland (inland from Tully), Australia. Transcribed and analysed by Tasaku Tsunoda. Interactive version created by David Nathan.
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Warumungu [wrm]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Jane Simpson
This article describes strategies used by Warumungu speakers to create new words and ways of expressing new concepts. Originally published as: Simpson, Jane. 1985. How Warumungu people express new concepts. Language in Central Australia 4:12-25
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Source: Jane Simpson
A research article on the dynamics of language change as evidenced by the languages spoken by and heard by children in four Aboriginal communities in WA and NT. Many Aboriginal children grow up in language landscapes that are undergoing rapid change - languages are declining but also changing, and new languages are being created.
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Source: Kathy Burns/RosemaryPlummer/Barkly Regional Arts
Pinarra Aku is a children
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Source: David Nash
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Wathaurong [aus-x-wtq]
Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Wemba Wemba [xww]
Source: Australian National Dictionary Centre/Barry Blake/Luise Hercus
Moomba is the name of a carnival held annually in Melbourne. While its folk etymology is "Let's get together and have fun", in fact 'moom' (mum) in some Victorian Aboriginal languages (such as Wemba Wemba) means 'buttocks' or 'anus', and 'ba' is a suffix meaning 'at' or 'in'.

The link is to the page for M; scroll down to find 'Moomba'.

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Wergaia [weg]
Source: Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority
A description of Aboriginal languages’ history and situation in Victoria. It also lists Victorian languages and their regions and contains a brief description of Wergaia.
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Western Desert [aus-x-wdq]
Source: Ng Media
Indie music label with songs in Western Desert language. You can listen to songs from this MySpace page.
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Wik Ngathan [wig]
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Source: Peter Sutton / ELAR
Archive deposit: video of community elders speaking about oral history and t contemporary issues, ethnobotanical information, transcriptions of audio recordings made in the 1970s. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Wik Yi’anh [wij]
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Source: Alice Gaby / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula including Kuuk Thaayorre, Wik Yi’anh, Kugu Muminh, Koko Bera, and Wik Mungkan. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Wik-Mungkan [wim]
Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Source: Alice Gaby / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of highly endangered Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula including Kuuk Thaayorre, Wik Yi’anh, Kugu Muminh, Koko Bera, and Wik Mungkan. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Peter Sutton / ELAR
Archive deposit: video of community elders speaking about oral history and t contemporary issues, ethnobotanical information, transcriptions of audio recordings made in the 1970s. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Christine Kilham, Mabel Pamulkan, Jennifer Pootchemunka and Topsy Wolmby/AuSIL
Wik-Mungkan is spoken on the western side of Cape York Peninsula.
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Wik-Ngatharr [wik]
Source: Ken Hale/MIT Linguistics
A collection of Ken Hale's papers and some of his unpublished teaching materials. Ken was an icon for endangered languages and also worked in Australia - papers here include ones on Warlpiri, Linngithigh, Pittapitta, Lardil, Wik (Cape York) languages
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Wiradjuri [wrh]
Source: Connie Ah See, NSW Ed Dept
The Wiradjuri Nation. Includes activities and materials for Wiradjuri to be used in the classroom.
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Source: Charles Sturt university
A course designed for graduates of the Certificate III in Wiradjuri Language. The course is also offered to students currently enrolled at CSU and to people who work with the Wiradjuri community. See also IKC400 Wiradjuri Culture and Heritage.
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Source: Charles Sturt University
The course provides skills to teach and use the Wiradjuri language in educational and community settings and to work with the Wiradjuri community in culturally appropriate and sensitive ways. The course covers the language, culture, heritage and history of the Wiradjuri nation, and awareness of the difficulties caused by centuries of colonisation, dislocation and dispossession.
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Source: ABC Open Albury-Wodonga
Geoff Anderson and teachers Kerry Gilbert, Ron Wardop and Lionel Lovett tell about new acceptance of the Wiradjuri language and culture in the wider community, and language learning is shown in three Parkes schools.
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Source: ABC
Article about recognition and learning of Wiradjuri in central NSW. In the accompanying video, Geoff Anderson and teachers Kerry Gilbert, Ron Wardop and Lionel Lovett tell about new acceptance in the wider community, and language learning is shown in three Parkes schools.
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Source: Yindyamarra
Yindyamarra speaks a formal welcome in Wiradjuri (YouTube video).
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Wirangu [wiw]
Source: Christie Peucker/Adelaide now
Wirangu teachers and academics note that language teaching in many SA schools is dominated by Pitjantjatjara while local languages and their local cultures should be given more attention. In the Ceduna area, Aboriginal teachers are now learning Wirangu from elders Gladys and Doreen Miller and then teaching at Koonibba Aboriginal School through activities like fishing, reef walking and painting.
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Source: SA Government
A listing of South Australian schools teaching Aboriginal languages, including Adnyamathanha, Antikirinya, Barngala, Dieri, Kaurna, Narungga, Nauo, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu.
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Source: South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability
Curriculum for Reception to Year 10 students, focusing on language learning and language custodianship, history, and revival, with specific materials for Kaurna, Narungga, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu and Yankunytjatjara.
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Woi wurrung [wyi]
Source: The Age/Orietta Guerrera
Article (December 7, 2005) about the launch of Aboriginal Children's Choir, who sang songs in Woiwurrung compsed by Wurundjeri elder Joy Murphy.
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Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Source: VACL
Thornbury Primary School’s Woiwurrung Language Program teaches prep - grade 2 students and extends to include older classes through the Indigenous Studies program. With the support of key Elders of the Wurundjeri Council, lessons are conducted by Koorie Educator Phil Cooper, Wurundjeri woman Mandy Nicholson (VACL officer and Woiwurrung language specialist), and LOTE teacher Leeann Sartorel. Page includes link to Woi wurrung digital storybooks for iOS.
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Worrorra [wro]
Source: Mark Clendon
A detailed linguistic description of the Worrorra language (PDF, 494 pages).
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Wurundjeri [aus-x-woq]
Source: Beth Gott and the Friends of Herring Island
Discussion of seasons in the Melbourne, with Wurundjeri terms
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Yaegl [xya]
Source: Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-op
Background information and a few resources for revitalisation of the Yaygirr/Yaegl language of north-coastal NSW.
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Yan-nhangu [jay]
Source: Claire Bowern / ELAR
Archive deposit: over 140 audio and video recordings of speakers of Yan-nha?u, made at Milingimbi, Arnhem Land, during fieldwork in 2007. Includes some translations into English and Djambarrpuyngu. Genres include conversation, translation, elicitation and narration. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols, and access may require negotiation with the depositor. See also >a href="http://elar.soas.ac.uk/deposit/0046">additional deposit for Yan-nhangu.
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Yankunytjatjara [kdd]
Source: South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability
Curriculum for Reception to Year 10 students, focusing on language learning and language custodianship, history, and revival, with specific materials for Kaurna, Narungga, Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, Wirangu and Yankunytjatjara.
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Source: NPY Women
This page hosts a downlodable PDF document called Uti Kulintjaku: A compendium of words for talking about mental health. It includes terms in Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra, as well as translations from English into these languages.
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Yanyuwa [jao]
Source: Monash University
A collaboration between Monash Indigenous Centre and others including IT and animators, this site aims to show “how best to construct a living archive that is a decolonised space in which communities are happy to see their material stored.” It features 8 compelling animations accompanied by voiceovers in Yanyuwa.
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Source: Monash Indigenous Centre
Animated stories to assist Elders and younger generations in the sharing and preservation of stories that combine Yanyuwa (and other communities’) history, knowledge, poetry, songs, performance and language; "a living archive that is a decolonised space in which communities are happy to see their material stored".
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Source: John Bradley/Monash University
Presentation about the long term project documenting the Yanyuwa language and culture through animation that is both culturally appropriate as well as effective for revitalisation. See also Monash Country Lines Archive to view the animations and for further information.
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Source: Shellie Morris and the Borroloola Songwomen
Shellie Morris and the Borroloola Songwomen with the Gondwana National Indigenous Children's Choir performing Waliwaliyangu li-Anthawirriyarra a-Kurija - Saltwater People Song, at the 2011 Deadly Awards in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House. See also The Song Peoples Sessions and The Age article.
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Source: John Bradley and Jean Kirton
Dictionary and cultural resource that includes Yanyuwa-English and English-Yanyuwa dictionary, text, maps, illustrations and bibliography.
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Yawuru [ywr]
Source:
Characters include Dianne Appleby, a linguist and speaker of the two languages of her parents - Karrajarri and Yawuru. Dianne regularly performs Welcome to Country ceremonies and was instrumental in establishing Yawuru language classes at the Cable Beach Primary School.
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Source: RNLD
A list of some mobile apps for Indigenous languages, including Anindilyakwa, Gamilaraay, Iwaidja, Nyoongar, Yawuru, and Yugambeh. Most are basic wordlists.
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Source: Rarrdjali Aboriginal Corporation (Mick Manolis)
Site from Yawuru people from around the Broome area; with hundreds of thematically organised words and phrases, all with audio.
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Source: Nyamba Buru Yawuru
Yawuru community website. The Yawuru people are the native title holders of Broome, WA. Includes newsletter, and Language Centre resources with audio lessons under ‘Word of the Day’.
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Yidiny [yii]
Source: Claire Bowern, Barry Alpher and Erich Round
A poster revisiting description by Dixon, arguing for the use of acoustic analysis rather than impressionistic analyses based on written examples.
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Yindjibarndi [yij]
Source: Staff and students of Roebourne Primary School
[No longer available from source but archived at NLA - try this link] Plants used by the community for bush tucker and for bush medicine, with names, pictures, and usage notes.
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Source: Wangka Maya
Comprehensive site based around supporting the languages of the Pilbara area. Has information and resources for 26 Pilbara languages, including overviews and examples, dictionaries, and language teaching materials.
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Source: Staff and students of Roebourne Primary School
[No longer available from source but archived at NLA - try this link] Most of the people in Roebourne are from the Yindjibarndi and Banyjima tribes. These tribes were moved from their traditional lands of Boomagee and Birrdithuulangu, into Roebourne. The Yindjibarndi people call Roebourne Ieramagadu. With sounds.
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Yinhawangka [ywg]
Source: June Injie / Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre
A story book, with audio, told in Yinhawangka by June Injie and in English by her granddaughter Montell Kelly. The story is about the animals found in the Pilbara region. The book uses ‘sound printing’ technology where sound is integrated with the book by hidden microscopic printing - audio is played by moving an special pen across the page. The book can be purchased from this website.
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Yolngu [aus-x-yoq]
Source: Charles Darwin University
The course provides Indigenous and non-Indigenous students with theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to engage in culturally informed language work, in particular the maintenance, reclamation and revitalisation of Australian Indigenous languages. It includes units in general descriptive and theoretical linguistics, sociolinguistics with particular reference to language and identity, language endangerment and language revitalisation, language planning and policy in relation to Australian Indigenous languages, practical application of linguistic study such as language teaching materials, how languages are embedded within diverse cultural context and cultural ownership, and acc
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Source: Stephen Page, Wayne Blair & Kathy Balngayngu Marika
A play about life in Arnhem Land, performed in the Yolngu language and "snatches of Pidgin English". Was performed by the Sydney Theatre Company.
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Source: Michael Christie
The author argues that digital forms like databases and metadata are not culturally neutral; they typically opaquely encode assumptions about structure and representation, and how one interacts with them. By revealing these assumptions, Yolngu (Aboriginal) forms of knowledge and literacy can be applied to database design and deployment; however ‘long term, deeply negotiated and collaborative processes where questions of the nature, politics and creation of knowledge remain central.’
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Source: ARDS
Background information and 900-word dictionary of the Dha?u languages of Yol?u matha -- (Wangurri, G
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Source: ARDS
A dictionary of anatomy (the human body) in Yol?u Matha and English. Has extensive definitions in Yol?u Matha; also contains information on polite word choices.
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Source: Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu
Live acoustic solo of Gurrumul's international hit song in Gumay, a Yolngu language. (YouTube video)
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: ARDS
English wordlist for the Dha?u Dictionary.
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Source: ARDS/Aboriginal Interpreter Service/North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency
A downloadable PDF containing detalled descriptions and translations of legal terms in plain English and in Yol?u Matha.
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Source: Glottolog
Glottolog’s resource page for Gupapuyngu, a Yolngu language of NT. The page shows Gupapuyngu’s location on a map, its place within its language family, and a large number of references for the language (most are harvested from bibliographic sources and the items are not necessarily online). See also the main Glottolog page.
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Source: Yolngu people / Yasunori Hayashi
Site with a range of information about Yolngu culture, language, placenames, and about 30 songs. The whole site may be viewed in Yolngu matha, English, or Japanese. Note: the media may require browser plugins.
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Source: Michael Christie / Helen Verran / Waymamba Gaykamangu
This project ran from 2003-6 and investigated ‘digital systems which support indigenous people building collective memory’ with a focus on Yolngu peoples. See in particular the publications page for a large number of interesting papers about digital technologies and Aboriginal knowledge.
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Source: ABC / Aboriginal Interpreter Service
The ABC, with the help of the Aboriginal Interpreter Service (NT), is trialling an Indigenous language News Service in Warlpiri and Yolngu Matha. Two ABC news bulletins are recorded each weekday. The daily bulletins can be heard on this page, with recent bulletins on SoundCloud, and on some Indigenous radio stations.
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Source: ABC/Alyssa Betts
The community of Galiwin'ku on Elcho Island want to use their language’s spelling system to write street signs and their own names. Their language, Yol?u matha (Yolngu language), has a small number of letters not used in standard English (but which are perfectly available in all writing technologies, since they are part of the International Unicode standard). Community members believe their language is being snubbed and weakened, while the NT Place Names Committee argue that only standard English can be used, despite claiming to support a Dual Naming Policy.
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Source: Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre, Yirrkala
Beautifully produced audio and video of performances by various artists, in Yolngu languages.
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Source: Indigemedia Inc, Christensen Fund, South Australian Film Corporation and Screen Australia
The award winning movie Twelve Canoes,directors Rolf de Heer and Peter Djigirr and starring members of the Ramingining community, speaking various Yolngu languages (see Wikipedia entry for more details . You can choose to view in either Yolngu or English. There are additional support materials, a study guide etc.
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Source: Yirrkala residents/Museum of Australian Democracy
Image of famous petition now in Australian Parliament House. See also Bark petitions: Indigenous art and reform for the rights of Indigenous Australians.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
The University teaches tertiary level units in Yolngu languages and culture. Advisors to course design and delivery include senior Yolngu people from Darwin, Milingimbi, Galiwin'ku, Yirrkala, Gapuwiyak, and Ramingining. Course including Introduction to Yolngu Languages and Culture, and Yolngu Matha conversation can be taken by distance education using the WWW.
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Source: Charles Darwin University, School of Indigenous Knowledges and Public Policy
A place for Yol?u and Balanda to learn about Yol?u life and language. Has links to research and courses. See also Yolngu Studies and Research.
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Source: ARDS
Online purchase of publications for learning Gupapuyngu. ARDS (Aboriginal Resource and Development Services) is an arm of the Northern Regional Council of Congress of the Uniting Church.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
Innovative dictionary covering most of the Yolngu languages and providing a variety of search methods, including Fuzzy Search, Filter Find, and English Finderlist. Many of the Yolngu words have audio pronunciation.
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Source: ARDS
A community radio station broadcast in the languages of the Yolngu people, to six communities and 30 homelands in northeast Arnhem Land, Darwin and Palmerston. In many of the homelands Yolngu radio is the only freely available media provider.
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Source: Yothu Yindi
One of the oldest Aboriginal sites on the Web. Hear song clips and greetings from Mandawuy Yunupingu in his language Gumatj .
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Yorta Yorta [xyy]
Source: Sharon Atkinson and Rochelle Patten
A Yorta Yorta story about the formation of Dhungalla (the name of the Murray River in Yorta Yorta). Spoken in Yorta Yorta and English.
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Source: R.H. Matthews
This 1902 document has grammatical and vocabulary description for some languages of southern Queensland, central NSW, and northern Victoria, including (as Matthews spelt them) Yualeai, Pikumbil, Kawambarai, Kurnu, Tyake (Mystic), Dyirringan, Yota-yota, and Bureba. [PDF 190 pages]
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Source: Arts Victoria/VACL/Authors
A beautifully-produced collection of stories from Aboriginal authors/storytellers from all regions of Victoria - "the first contemporary compilation of Victorian Aboriginal Creation Stories told by Victorian Aboriginal People, and the first to extensively use languages of origin to tell the stories". The text has authentic and innovative mixing of surviving Aboriginal languages and English. the book also includes (p. 8) the VACL map of Victorian languages.
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Yugambeh [yub]
Source: State Library of Queensland
A set of interactive multimedia audio books for learning basic vocabulary of Queensland languages including Butchullla, Gudjal, Gunggari, and Yugambeh.
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Source: Luistxo Fernandez
Information, including placenames, for the languages: Guugu Yimithirr, Dyirbal, Gooniyandi, Arabana-Wangkangurru, Yagara and Yugambeh.
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Source: Luistxo Fernandez
Information, including placenames, for the languages: Guugu Yimithirr, Dyirbal, Gooniyandi, Arabana-Wangkangurru, Yagara and Yugambeh.
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Source: Tyrone Drahm & Alec Warner
The song was sung as part of the launch of an Reconcilliation Action Plan at the Dreamworld and Whitewater theme parks. See also the newspaper article with further information.
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Source: RNLD
A list of some mobile apps for Indigenous languages, including Anindilyakwa, Gamilaraay, Iwaidja, Nyoongar, Yawuru, and Yugambeh. Most are basic wordlists.
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Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Yugarabul [aus-x-ygq]
Source: Yugambeh Corporation
The Yugambeh museum page has links to a range of language resources including Yugambeh app, local language map, and language wordlists for Yugambeh, Gungarri, Yugarabul, Wakka Wakka, Jandai, Bidjara, Gabi Gabi, and Gamilaraay.
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Yuwaalaraay [aus-x-yuq]
Source: John Giacon and David Nathan
Interactive multimedia resource for Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay. Includes searchable dictionary with over 2,600 entries, all including audio; 1000 spoken sentences, all transcribed, and linked to the dictionary; 44 songs and stories, all transcribed, and linked to the dictionary; various games.

Free registration and download (Windows only).

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Source: R.H. Matthews
This 1902 document has grammatical and vocabulary description for some languages of southern Queensland, central NSW, and northern Victoria, including (as Matthews spelt them) Yualeai, Pikumbil, Kawambarai, Kurnu, Tyake (Mystic), Dyirringan, Yota-yota, and Bureba. [PDF 190 pages]
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Source: John Giacon / LDC
A paper considering linguists’ roles, methods, and principles in language revival, largely based on John’s experience with Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
A downloadable academic grammar, complied from historical sources, with introduction to the people and language, and notes on the closely related Yuwaalaraay and Yuwaaliyaay languages. Published 1993.
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Source: Yuwaalaraay Language Program/John Giacon
Dictionaries and a range of links and learning materials for Yuwaalaraay and Gamilaraay.
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Yuwaaliyaay [aux-x-ywq]
Source: Peter K. Austin
A downloadable academic grammar, complied from historical sources, with introduction to the people and language, and notes on the closely related Yuwaalaraay and Yuwaaliyaay languages. Published 1993.
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Many languages or language not specified
Source: John Hobson
A language education site with many teaching resources and links. It is focused on NSW languages but has many widely-applicable resources and links.
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Source: ABC
The ABC’s portal page for Aboriginal topics, includes daily rotation of news items, message board, special topics, language map.
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Source: Muurbay Aboriginal Language & Culture Cooperative
ABC’s Jill Emberson interviews activists Uncle Gary Williams and Dr Gary Foley about Aboriginal history, education and languages (13 October 2014). You can listen to the recorded interview.
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Source: National and State Libraries Australasia
Library policy document acknowledging: 1. The right of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to be informed about language materials relating to their own culture and heritage; 2. The role of communities as custodians of language as central to the development of policy and practice; 3. The right of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to determine use and access provisions for language materials which may be community controlled or require cultural consideration. See also NSLA Position Statement for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander library servic
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Source: David Horton/Museum of Australian Democracy
The definitive map of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander territories and nations. There are some disagreements about aspects of the map but it is the most current and authoritative one available. Zoomable.
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Source: David Horton/AIATSIS
AIATSIS has finally published online their own highly-influential map of Australian Indigenous groups. Includes a zoomable function, information about the compilation of the map, and this useful list of alternative language names and spellings.
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Source: David Horton/AIATSIS/ABC
Map of Australian language territories. Although this map has been criticised, disclaimed by AIATSIS, and has appeared and disappeared on various websites, it remains the most widely known and used map of language territories.
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Source: NSW Department of Education and Training / NSW AECG
Extensive list of annotated resources including for NSW languages.
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Source: Sue Wesson/VACL
Comprehensive report on Aboriginal names for Victorian plants and animals, researched and extracted from archives and colonial sources. Includes the lists of terms as well as bibliographics and discussion of methodology. See also the VACL host page with further information about the project.
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Source: NT Department of Local Government and Community Services
The Aboriginal Interpreter Service (AIS) facilitates communication between service providers and Aboriginal people who do not speak English as a first language. The service has 300 registered interpreters covering more than 100 Aboriginal languages and dialects spoken in the Northern Territory. See also map and information about NT Aboriginal languages.
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Source: Aboriginal Interpreter Service NT / NT Government
The Aboriginal Interpreter Service (AIS) facilitates communication between service providers and Aboriginal people who do not speak English as a first language. The service has 300 registered interpreters covering more than 100 Aboriginal languages and dialects spoken in the Northern Territory. See also their map and information about NT Aboriginal languages.
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Source: ABC
ABC articles on Indigenous languages. Regularly updated feed with links to the latest articles from ABC News.
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Source: NSW Government
Practical advice, resources and case studies for the teaching of Aboriginal languages in NSW schools. See also the many resources downloadable from this page.
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Source: NSW government
Teaching and syllabus information for and from NSW schools. Click on Leaning from each school's experience for case studies and information from Brewarrina, Broulee, Forbes North, Hillston Central, Lightning Ridge, St Joseph's, Bourke, Bowraville, Nambucca Heads, Dubbo, Lower Darling, Menindee, Parkes and Vincentia schools, some with students and teachers speaking and singing.
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Source: New South Wales Government
Practical advice and resources for Aboriginal language and literacy teaching. See also QALT.
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Source: NSW Department of Education
A set of newsletters produced from 2005-2010, to share news, stories, pictures and opinions amongst Aboriginal teaching teams in NSW. Althouigh it is no longer produced, there are many interesting stories and of course interesting history of developments in the field.
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Source: Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages
The map of Victorian languages was produced with contributions from both the Indigenous Community & academic research. The A4-size map is downloadable.
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Source: School Curriculum and Standards Authority
Syllabus and assessment materials for Years 11 and 12 learning about Aboriginal languages, their linguistic structures, texts, community and cultural contexts, and protocol.
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Source: Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority
A downloadable booklet Aboriginal Languages, cultures and reclamation in Victorian schools: standards P-10 and protocols. It describes standards, methods and protocols for teaching Aboriginal Languages.
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Source: NSW Board of Studies
Assistance for schools in setting up Aboriginal language programs under the NSW K-10 Syllabus.
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Source: NSW Board of Studies
A 2003 document providing advice on designing Aboriginal languages programs and their assessment. [MS Word, 57 pages]
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Source: Harold Koch and Luise Hercus (editors)
Fully downloadable chapters on Indigenous placenames across the whole of Australia, drawing on geography, linguistics, history, and anthropology. Click on "PDF" to reach the download page.
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Source: AIATSIS
ASEDA - Aboriginal Studies Electronic Data Archive: A catalogue of files on Australian Indigenous Languages held by the ASEDA project at AIATSIS.
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Source: Gleebooks/Kim Johnston
See the Languages resources section for Gleebooks' extensive list of titles for NSW languages learning resources.
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Source: Robert Hodge
Draws on Eric Michaels' "cowboy anthropology" which, while stirring, conformed to structuralist linguistics "which has virtually monopolised the study of Aboriginal languages".
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Source: Australian National Dictionary Centre, ANU
Bibliography on Aboriginal Words in Australian English
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Source: VACL
VACL announced that they will in the future offer accredited courses Cert 3 and Cert 4 in Learning an Endangered Aboriginal Language. The courses will teach the basics in learning an Aboriginal Language and provide the opportunity to gain qualifications towards teaching an Aboriginal Language in schools or community.
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Source: NSW Department of Education and Training
Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme (AGQTP) project for schools starting Aboriginal language programs. Includes syllabus examples; downloadable teaching resources for NSW languages; audio on language protocols for consultation from Lynne Riley-Mundine, Hazel Rhodes and Clarrie Hoskins.
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Source: D Nathan et al
Misc collected responses in 1999 to the NT Government's policy to phase out bilingual education in the Territory.
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Source: Patrick McConvell/Harold Koch/Laurent Dousset/Jane Simpson/Jeanie Bell/Piers kelly
Kinship charts, terminologies and systems from published and archival sources for over 607 Australian Aboriginal languages [editor’s note: the large number of languages (actually, language names) results from the project’ use of language names and spellings as found in the literature; a given language can have many names or spellings. Most people agree that the number of Australian languages is in the range 250-350].
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Source: AIATSIS
AIATSIS' searchable database on Australian languages, with information on language names, numbers of speakers, locations, resources, researchers, and "documentation scores", assembled from a number of sources. Searchable by map (not functioning at time of review), language name and location.
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Source: Greg Dickson/Crikey
The author chooses 10 moments where Indigenous languages have captured the nation's imagination. Many links to related web pages.
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Source: Facebook group
Facebook page with news, links etc. Page created by Mrs Elvianna Dorante-Day with the aim to promote, preserve and maintain the use of Australia's Indigenous languages.
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Source: Duane Hamacher
This blog-format resource brings together researchers who are studying the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Indigenous Australians. Includes some posts and resources with language names for constellations, stone arrangements, and other astronomical phenomena.
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Source: Manikay.com
Includes historical song recordings in Warlpiri and other NT languages. Links to many other artists singing in Indigenous languages. See also list of Arnhem Land recordings.
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Source: Students from The University of New England, NSW
Student-initiated project to use a blog to raise awareness and share knowledge about Australian languages and related issues. Lots of interesting links and snippets.
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Source: Sovereign Union of First Nations and Peoples in Australia
This page brings together well-known maps from other sources - including the Horton/AIATSIS map and the Tindale map, all zoomable and downloadable.
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Source: National Library of Australia
A guide to help identify NLA material on languages, arranged by State/Territory and then by language name. Note that most most of the material you might identify is not actually available online, although some have Finding Aids (summaries and indexes).
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Source: Australian Linguistic Society
In 1984, ALS drew up a list of Lingiustic rights of Aboriginal and Islander communities which still provides valid advice that today’ linguists could aspire to.
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Source: ANU
A list for people involved with Australian languages. Established 1994. To join, email: majordomo@coombs.anu.edu.au with body message:
subscribe Australian-Linguistics-L <your-e-mail-address>.
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Source: Kevin Rennie
On 21 February 2015, Indigenous people around the world collaborated in the Tweet for International Mother Language Day campaign. Over 100 Australian languages were represented in tweets on that day.
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Source: ABC
The ABC’s Aboriginal arts and culture program presented by Daniel Browning. Some stories cover language topics, such as this episode on Jack Buckskin teaching Kaurna.
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Source: Batchelor Press
Batchelor Press is the publishing arm of Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education. Batchelor Institute develops teaching and learning resources primarily for Indigenous students in remote communities, where most students have English as a second or third language. These resources are developed by community elders, students and teaching staff.
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Source: Tasaku Tsunoda
A 2003 bibliography on language endangerment, revival, policy, and social and ethical issues. Note: as of 2011, the original version is offline, but there are still some versions on the web, including this one from the University of Hawaii.
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Source: various
Selection of resources created after the NT Government announced that Bilingual Education Programmes would be axed in 1999.
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Source: Brian Devlin / ABC
Claims that students in NT schools with bilingual programs performed worse than other students in skills tests were used by the NT Government to dismantle bilingual programs in schools. This paper considers - and rejects - those claims.
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Source: Lester-Irabinna Rigney
In this paper from 2002, Lester-Irabinna Rigney advocated for the formal recognition of Indigenous languages through constitional amendment and the establishment of a National Indigenous Languages Institute. The paper also discusses issues of reconciliation and language stabilisation and revitalisation.
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Source: Kevin Lowe / Michael Walsh
A paper describing recent language revitalisation efforts in NSW and comparing them to those in California.
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Source: Ghil'ad Zuckermann / NITV / SBS
In this video, Ghil'ad Zuckermann of University of Adelaide calls on the federal government to compensate Aboriginal peoples who had their languages stolen (i.e. who suffered linguicide). Suitable financial compensation can then used for language revival and other linguistic activities.
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Source: ABC/Nance Haxton
Media article, with audio, on the threat to the remaining Indigenous languages. The audio includes singing by Lenora Adid in her language Kala Lagaw Ya.
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Source: CAAMA
The Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA) produces, broadcasts and sells Indigenous media content, including radio, music and film - many in the languages of the region and also some languages further afield.
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Source: Gidarjil development Corporation
This language centre in Bundaberg has an impressive set of aims for supporting language communities Queensland from Rockhampton to Maryborough and west to Longreach and the Northern Territory border.
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Source: Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
CALL is a centre of excellence for the research, documentation and preservation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages. Offers research, language documentation and curation, publications, professional development, advocacy and resources
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Source: RNLD
A nationally accredited course suitable for staff in Aboriginal language centres, the health industry, national parks, land councils, Aboriginal corporations, tourism and hospitality, and community members who wish to develop and implement language projects and/or learn more about Aboriginal languages.
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Source: Doug Marmion / Kazuko Obata / Jakelin Troy / AIATSIS
This 2014 report follows on from the first National Indigenous Languages Survey (NILS1, 2004-5). The report aims to provide better understanding of:
1. the current situation of Australian languages
2. activities supporting Australian languages
3. people
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Source: AIATSIS
The Dennis Daniel Bannister collection, Papers on The Aboriginal Languages of Queensland, 1977 [Finding aid].
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Source: Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity
Training suporting communities in language maintenance. Free training programs are available to Aboriginal and mainland Torres Strait Islander people in communities and organisations who want to develop, run and manage their own language projects.
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Source: ACARA (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority)
The Framework provides flexible guidance for developing programs for any Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander language. It has three pathways: 1. First Language Learner; 2. Language Revival Learner; 3. Second Language Learner. It also provides principles and protocols for consulting with communities when developing and delivering languages learning programs in schools. This document contains full details for all 3 pathways. [PDF 131 pages]
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Source: ACARA (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority)
The Framework provides flexible guidance for developing programs for any Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander language. It has three pathways: 1. First Language Learner; 2. Language Revival Learner; 3. Second Language Learner. It also provides principles and protocols for consulting with communities when developing and delivering languages learning programs in schools. [PDF, 2 pages]
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Source: ABC/Rachael Kohn
Interview about the Sharing Stories Digital Storytelling Program which has recorded stories from several communities. Includes commentary from Mark Nakarrma Guyula.
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Source: Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project/SOAS
ELAR holds collections of language documentation, including many Australian languages, including Warlpiri, Wanyjirra, Gija, Mawng, Yan-nha?u, Golpa, Kayardild, Kuku Thaypan, Awu Alaya, Wik Ngathan, Wik Mungkan, Umpila, Kuuku Ya
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Source: Australian Human Rights Commission / Mick Gooda and Katie Kiss
The paper argues that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should be implemented so that legislation, policy, programs and service delivery empower rather than disempower communities, through observing principles of self-determination; participation in decision-making, free, prior and informed consent, and good faith; respect for and protection of culture; and equality and non-discrimination. The document repeatedly emphasises that support for Indigenous languages is an element in the promotion and protection of rights and identity.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics
A list of Australia's Indigenous languages with basic facts about classification, number of speakers, variant names, and links to pages for each language. A useful source but note that many languages are not listed.
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Source: PARADISEC/University of Sydney
List of common questions such as "What is the meaning of placename X?" with answers and links to other resources. Part of the Transient Languages and Culture blog. Note that most of the links are no longer working.
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Source: FATSIL
Guide to protocols, especially for language projects involving linguists working with communities. Also available at this Candaian First peoples' site.
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Source: First Languages Australia
A national organisation to facilitate discussion between communities and government and non-government partners in regard to Australia's Indigenous languages. Includes news, features, and resources including video in several languages.
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Source: Association of Children's Welfare Agencies
May 2013 document from then-Minister for Education Peter Garrett announcing the first national approach to Indigenous language teaching.
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Source: Jeanie Bell, Anke Boewe, Kate Donnelly and Mary Laughren
Catalogue of the E. Flint papers held in the Fryer Library, with detailed information about Aboriginal languages and their speakers.
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Source: Friends of Bilingual Learning
Friends of Bilingual Learning supports the development of the Northern Territory as a multilingual society acknowledging communication through Indigenous languages and English. FOBL formed in 2008 in response to the everyday struggle that Indigenous people experience such as disproportionate representation within the judicial, welfare and health systems, and constant negative media about poor educational attendance and outcomes. The site includes news items and links to materials about multilingualism and Indigenous languages in education.
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Source: Jane Simpson, Jo Caffery, and Patrick McConvell
AIATSIS Discussion Paper (2009) of the Northern Territory government's policy changes withdrawing the teaching of Indigenous languages in schools. Also available from ResearchGate.
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Source: Harald Hammarstr
Glottolog provides a comprehensive, innovative, easily-searchable catalogue of classification and reference information for the world’s languages, especially lesser known languages.
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Source: Mary-Anne Gale
Mary-Anne
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Source: Jennifer Runner
Jennifer presents a range of greetings in over 100 Australian languages. The author describes her sources and methods on her FAQ page.
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Source: Dandjoo Moordiyap Dabakarn / Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education / Alex Smee
A film made at the 2013 WANALA (Western and Northern Aboriginal Language alliance) conference in Bunbury WA, with introductions and snippets spoken from a variety of languages.
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Source: NT Aboriginal Interpreter Service
Map and list of most widely spoken Aboriginal languages in the NT. Also listed by region and community/place name.
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Source: Nicholas Thieberger
The Internet Archive version of Nick’s comprehensive 1996 annotated bibliography and guide to the Indigenous languages of most of Western Australia.
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Source: ABC
ABC Hindsight program (4 July 2009) about reviving Aboriginal languages. Transcript available (former website included audio, video, and interviews with Aboriginal teachers and students, linguists and others, interactive map, all now sadly removed by the ABC).
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Source: NSW Board of Studies / NSW Government
A bibliography and weblinks for resources on Aboriginal language programs.
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Source: Institute for Aboriginal Development, Alice Springs
Publishing and sales of superb texts including Pitjantjatjara/ Yankunytjatjara to English Dictionary, Eastern and Central Arrernte to English Dictionary, Gamilaraay/Yuwaalaraay/Yuwaalayaay to English Dictionary, Learner's Guide to Warumungu, Pintupi/Luritja Dictionary (3rd Edition), Ngaanyatjara and Ngaatjatjarra to English Dictonary, Central Anmatyerr Picture Dictionary, Kaytetye Picture Dictionary and many more.
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Source: Jenny Green
Video clips with explanations, and project notes. The Iltyem-Iltyem project aims to record and document traditional handsigns used by people in Central Australia.
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Source: AIATSIS
Outlines AIATAIS’ activities and resources for Australian languages.
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Source: ABC
A clickable and zoomable language map (based on the Horton map; see also this one) with links to resources for various languages. This is one of the best versions of the Horton map still available on the web.
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Source: David Horton / AIATSIS
The ABC’s version of the Horton map of Australian Indigenous nations. Has a handy movable magnifier - mouse over the map to see enlarged detail. There is also a link to download a larger higher-resolution version.
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Source: State Library of NSW
The Rediscovering Indigenous Languages project is making archival collections of the State Library of New South Wales accessible. The site features historic word lists, records and other documents relating to Indigenous languages across Australia. You can search by community name or using a map.
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Source: Australian Government, Attorney General's Department, Ministry for the Arts
The principal national Indigenous languages funding (formerly ILS, MILR) is now packaged in two streams: Indigenous Languages and Arts (Languages) (to support language centres etc. and Indigenous language workers in funded organisations); and Indigenous Languages and Arts (Projects) (for traditional and contemporary Indigenous culture and arts projects). This page has documents with guidelines and eligibility and selection criteria.
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Source: AIATSIS Library
Language and people bibliographies: lists of print materials held in AIATSIS collections. See also AUSTLANG and OZBIB language databases.
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Source: Charles E. Grimes/Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
The paper argues that the NT government and its education system continue to ignore solid research on best practice education in Indigenous communities. also includes an extensive bibliography on language and education in multilingual societies, many linked to online sources. [PDF]
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Source: ACER/Nola Purdie/Tracey Frigo/Clare Ozolins/Geoff Noblett/Nick Thieberger/Janet Sharp
A report on the national project to strengthen Indigenous languages programmes in schools, providing a detailed survey of the current situation in Indigenous languages education in Australian schools. The report is for language teachers and speakers, Aboriginal communities, schools, and policy makers.
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Source: Australian Government, Attorney-General's Department, Ministry for the Arts
The program provides funding to revive and maintain languages, support language workers, and support various forms of artistic expression. The linked guidelines describe the current funding approach, which prioritises offers made by the department directly to language organisations. Formerly known as Indigenous Languages Support, and the Maintenance of Indigenous Languages and Records program.
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Source: Jane Simpson / The Conversation
Jane considers parallels between forced assimilation and the imposition of English in the context of the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People. She argues for ‘best practice’ in schools, where the home language is used as the medium of instruction in the classroom at the start, and later children transition in a systematic way to add English. Ultimately, there must be much more Indigenous language - and well-trained language-speaker teachers - throughout schools with Indigenous students.
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Source: Greg Dickson/Crikey
This article takes an alternative view on the so-called "literacy gap" amongst Indigenous people, and argues for greater recognition and rights to literacy in people"s own Indigeous languages, not (only) English.
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Source: Indigenous Community Television (ICTV), Indigenous Remote Communications Association (IRCA)
ICTV's online video streaming service: media sharing site made by and for Indigenous people in remote Australia. A range of video stories and music videos in Aboriginal languages.

Also access to live radio from various communities.

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Source: Australian government/House of Representatives Committees
"The inquiry is interested in finding out about the links between Indigenous languages and improving education, community wellbeing, interpreting services and strategies to close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage. The Committee will investigate how the use of Indigenous languages, particularly in early education, can assist in improving education and vocational outcomes where English is a second language. The Indigenous languages policies of Australian governments and the effectiveness of Indigenous language maintenance and revival will be investigated."

Includes submissions received and transcripts of hearings. As for June 3, 2012 the final report was not yet available.

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Source: House of Representatives/Australian Parliament
A 2011 enquiry into benefits of giving attention and recognition to Indigenous languages, benefits of including Indigenous languages in early education, methods to improve outcomes etc. The final report of September 2012, submissions and proceedings are online.
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Source: Myf Turpin/IAD Press
The first comprehensive dictionary of the Kaytetye language, with sentence examples, finderlist, cultural information etc. See also the Jane Simpson’s review.
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Source: National Library of Australia
Pandora is an archived collection selected by the NLA to provide long-term access to culturally important websites. Since so many websites about Indigenous languages have come and gone over the years, you may find a useful website among the approx 1500 archived websites returned by a search for ‘Aboriginal languages’. The collection began in 1996, but several of the websites only go back to the early 2000s. See also the Indigenous languages page.
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Source: University of Queensland
This course examines one Australian Aboriginal language, comparing it with other Australian languages and with English. Topics include phonology, grammar, socio-linguistic variation, language change, working with language speakers and historical documents (not offered every year).
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Source: AIATSIS
Searchable database of names, codes and locations for Australian languages and peoples.
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Source: AuSIL
A large collection of research papers and other language documentation produced by SIL members. Includes nearly 100 papers on topics such as Alyawarra Phonology, Iwaidja Narrative Discourse, Gugu-Yalanji Clause Types, Ngaanyatjarra Sentences etc.
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Source: Ethnologue, Summer Institute of Linguistics
Family tree diagram for Australian languages, with links to individual language pages with basic information about the languages. A useful source but note that many languages are not listed.
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Source: Laurent Dousset
List of Australian Aboriginal tribes from AusAnthrop.
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Source: David Nash
A page of useful links to online resources for language policy in relation to Australian languages.
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Source: Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages
A series of 16 factsheets to support communities working to revive their "newly living languages, brought from the past into the present and future". Arranged around methods, practice, and principles, topics include dealling with words, everyday language, healing, and linguistics.
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Source: David Nathan
This paper, given at Learning IT Together in 1999; argues that some rhetorical positions, as well as overtheorised approaches to IT in Aboriginal settings, work against the effective use of computing in support of language maintenance and revitalisation. It provides an interesting backdrop for surveying what has and has not been achieved through use of IT since 1999.
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Source: AIATSIS
Downloadable versions of the Language Thesaurus (as PDF or RTF).
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Source: Harold Koch / Rachel Nordlinger
Provides an overview of Australian languages, including their linguistic structures, genetic relationships, and issues of language maintenance and revitalisation. Note: unfortunately this desirable book is another high-priced volume from De Gruyter (even the PDF version costs $350).
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Source: Michael Walsh
A general survey of the nature and history of Australian languages (chapter 1 of Walsh & Yallop (eds) 1993 Language and Culture in Aboriginal Australia. [PDF, 13 pages]
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Source: Kazuko Obata and Jason Lee / Australian Bureau of Statistics
An article from 2010 providing a general outline of Australian languages and their place in contemporary Australia.
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Source: Glottolog / Harald Hammarstr
Map interface to Glottolog’s reference list of Australian languages. Provides language relationship information and comprehensive bibliographies.
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Source: Wikipedia
List of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island languages, alphabetical, with variant names and some ISO codes.
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Source: Charles Darwin University / Batchelor Institute / NT Government / ANU
LAAL (Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages) is a digital archive of endangered literature in Australian languages from the Northern Territory. Much of the literature is language teaching/literacy material created in schools, which is otherwise endangered by the instability of governmental support for mother tongue and bilingual programs. You can search the site by map, placename, language name, author, or category (such as Narrative or Language instruction). The literature materials are beautifully displayed and are viewable and downloadable as PDF or plain text. The site currently holds about 2250 books in 32 languages. Updates are posted on http://laal.cdu.edu.au/
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Source: First Languages Australia
A clip from a film on a project to identify and make available language materials at the State Library of NSW, featuring Ronald Briggs.
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Source: Australian National University
Dr Hercus' departmental web page. See also Dr Hercus' publications and research projects.
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Source: Magabala
An Indigenous Australian publishing house, publishing works by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors and editors, including works in Indigenous languages.
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Source: ABC/Message Stick
Article from 2009 - transcript of discussion about language reviitalisation from Aboriginal teachers and others from various regions who are teaching their languages.
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Source: First Languages Australia
This participatory project encourages schools with Indigenous students to translate a song into their own language, and then to upload and share the result. Various technical advice and teaching notes and resources are supplied. ABC Open may be able to travel to the community and provide technical assistance.
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Source: Claire Bowern
Claire's continually updated list of Australian language names, with ISO codes, language groupings, geographic co-ordinates and mapping polygon data. See also the blog page link.
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Source: University of Sydney
The program can be taken as a Certificate, Diploma, or Master’s. The Master’s program provides students with the knowledge and skills to implement the NSW Aboriginal Languages Syllabus from K-10, as well as to teach syllabi from other states and territories. Applications for 2016 close on 4 December 2015.
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Source: MLT / University of Adelaide
The Mobile Language team assists communities in South Australia with linguistic advice, training, workshops, and other language-related projects, and also outreach aspects such as provision of language materials and rasing community and public awareness. The site includes news, resources and references for several South Australian languages.
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Source: University of Adelaide
The Mobile Language Team provides assistance and training in language work and resource development for South Australian languages. The website has a range of advice, links and news about South Australian languages. The team consists of Peter Mühlhäusler, Karina Lester, Paul Monaghan, Clayton Cruse, Salote Bovoro, and Celeste Humphris
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Source: nginarra*
Regularly updated blog by ‘that munanga linguist’* on a range of topics related to Indigenous languages (mostly NT languages) and related matters, often entertaining and of current-affairs interest. See also Greg Dickson’s page on Academic.au.
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Source: AIATSIS
Online library catalogue of AIATSIS. Searchable for its large collection of Indigenous language-related materials. Click the iLink icon to go to the catalogue.
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Source: First Languages Australia
First Languages Australia promotes communication between communities and the government and other bodies whose work affects Australia's Indigenous languages. This site was formerly Nambur Yaalam Wiyeliko (words for "speak" in Gunnai (Victoria), Butchulla (Queensland), and Awabakal (NSW)).
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Source: Australian Government/AIATSIS/FATSIL
The National Indigenous Languages Survey (NILS) Report 2005 summarises and analyses a 2004 survey of Indigenous languages’ vitality, status and resources. There is also a academic discussion about the survey. See also the resport from the second survey, 2014.
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Source: FATSIL
Key organisations and community groups in Australia involved in the revitalisation and promotion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages.
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Source: National Library of Australia
The NLA holds an increasing amount of digitised materials. This link represents the results of a search for online resources for Aboriginal languages, finding 165 items (as at 10 June 2015) of varying relevance.
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Source: ABC/Maria Zijlstra/Ghil'ad Zuckermann
Interview with Ghil'ad Zuckermann introducing the concept of ‘Native tongue title’ (a blend of ‘native title’ and ‘native tongue’) which calls for Aboriginal people to be compensated in various ways for the loss of their languages through colonisation. You can download Zuckermann’s article here.
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Source: Ghil'ad Zuckermann / Shiori Shauto-Neoh / Giovanni Matteo Quer
A paper proposing a compensation scheme for loss of Indigenous languages, paralleling compensation schemes for some Stolen Generations victims. The paper describes the history of linguicide in Australia, and the benefits of using compensation to support language revival. The paper appeared in Australian Aboriginal Studies 2014/1. See also the Lingua Franca episode on this topic.
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Source: Mobile Language Team, University of Adelaide/Radio Adelaide 101.5FM
An occasional radio show show about South Australian Aboriginal languages, with program audio downloadable.
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Source: Nick Thieberger
A list of Nick’s publications, including several online items on Australian languages and linguistic methodologies.
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Source: Mark Rosenfelder
Numbers in languages around the world; includes several Australian languages. Accuracy of words should be rechecked elsewhere.
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Source: Claire Bowern / ABC
Robyn Williams interviews Claire Bowern, who talks about why languages can become endangered and why it matters, drawing on examples in Australia, where every Indigenous language is endangered. [audio and transcript]
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Source: David Nash
Links to several online dictionaries.
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Source: Arwarbukarl Cultural Resource Association Inc
A website for sharing and collaborating on activities surrounding Australia's traditional Aboriginal languages. Contains extensive links to language lists and maps, and to Community language programs and language centres throughout Australia.
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Source: State Library NSW / Tara Callinan / NITV
News item about the Rediscovering Indigenous Languages project by the State Library of NSW to identify, transcribe, digitise and catalogue its formerly unidentified Aboriginal languages materials, resulting in over 150 language collections across all states.
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Source: Kevin Lowe, New South Wales Board of Studies
Paper about the interaction between schools and communities, in regard to establishing language programs. Includes discussion about ownership and controls that Aboriginal communities seek over their languages. See also the abstract, which notes the author details.
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Source: Geraldine Triffitt
Lists all published works on Australian and Torres Strait Islands languages, incl descriptions, comparisons, dictionaries, grammars, surveys, bilingual education, language policy, pidgins, creoles, Aboriginal English. Search the catalogue for this title.
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Source: Claire Bowern
A regularly-updated blog of notices of recent papers on Australian languages.
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Source: PARADISEC
PARADISEC provides digital conservation and access focused on endangered languages of the Pacific region, but also actively supports Australian languages.
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Source: Claire Bowern
Claire created downloadable Google Earth (.kmz) files with locations of Australian languages, organised by family and subgroup.
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Source: National Library of Australia
Catalogue MS 8006:The R.H Mathews Papers consist largely of material relating to Mathews' anthropological research on the customs, social life and languages of the Australian Aborigines.
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Source: Michael Clyne and Sandra Kipp
An analysis of changing patterns of language diversity; includes statistics for languages spoken including Aboriginal languages.
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Source: Peter K. Austin
Peter’s web page has many downloadable publications and links to blog posts representing his long involvement with Aboriginal languages in NSW, SA and WA. See also Peter’s page on Academia.edu.
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Source: Jonathan Harrington, Macquarie University
Summary of phonetic and phonological characteristics of Australian languages.
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Source: Jonathan Harrington / Macquarie University
Sketch of the phonetics and phonologies of Australian languages.
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Source: Graham McKay
In this 2011 paper, describes the history of Indigenous languages policy, and concludes that recent and reasonable policies have not been implemented well, or at all, and furthermore, are undermined by the ‘dominant rhetoric’ about English skills and decrease in support for bilingual schooling.
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Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics
Apparently the most recent ABS stattistics on speakers of Indigenous languages. See also Australian Standard Classification of Languages.
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Source: Nicholas Thieberger, AIATSIS
Map showing numbers of speakers of Australian languages, based on Tindale map.
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Source: Queensland Indigenous Languages Advisory Committee
The Queensland Indigenous Languages Advisory Committee worked with language workers and projects around the state to compile a map and list of Queensland languages and their family groups.
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Source: SA Government DECS
The document supports teachers in planning, programming and assessing using the SACSA (South Australian Curriculum, Standards and Accountability) Framework. It includes a sample range of learning descriptors for languages including Kaurna, Wirangu and others, relating to the Key Ideas and Outcomes in Australian Indigenous languages R-10.
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Source: John Hobson / Kevin Lowe / Susan Poetsch / Michael Walsh / Others
Full text of this 2010 edited volume with foreword by Jeanie Bell and contributed chapters on language policy and planning, language in communities, language centres, language in education, literacy and oracy, technology, and language documentation. Direct link [PDF, 489 pages]
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Source: The University of Melbourne
The Unit’s researches aspects of Indigenous language in Australia across generations and communities, and how to identify and address the language needs of Indigenous people. The Unit consists of a multidisciplinary team which examines the sound system, syntax and semantics, discourse features and gesture, of languages, and explores their implications for children’s language learning.
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Source: RNLD
An Australian-based network supporting language documentation and revitalisation through training, resource sharing, networking, and advocacy. Has useful resources and links, including to the informative RNLD Maliing List.
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Source: Australian Government
This review addresses the role of broadcasting services, with several references to language and cultural transmission.
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Source: Gadj Maymuru / Jodie Maymuru
This site created and run by Gadj and Jodie Maymuru offers educational programs and resources for Aboriginal Communities and Australian schools. Most of the services and resources are offered on a commercial basis.
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Source: Skinnyfish Music
Darwin-based music publisher that works with and provides opportunities for Indigenous artists. Label includes artists, such as Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, who sing in indigenous languages
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Source: Australian Human Rights Commission / Social Justice Commissioner
The report surveys progress in the last 20 years and how lessons learnt can forward Indigenous human rights and improvements in outcomes. The report notes that real meaning can be given to the rhetoric of human rights through a framework based on the principles of self-determination, participation in decision-making, underpinned by free, prior and informed consent and good faith; respect for and protection of culture; and equality and non-discrimination. Languages and bilingual education are important elements. See also Social Justice Report 2012.
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Source: Australian Human Rights Commission
Social Justice Report 2009. Chapter 3: The perilous state of Indigenous languages in Australia.
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Source: Patrick McCloskey and others
A project to protect cultural heritage, languages and traditional song cycles, through new forms of musical expression. The site will present archival materials of both traditional music and of collaborations between contemporary and traditional Indigenous musicians. The first presentation is of Shellie Morris, the Yanyuwa Song Women and the Gondwana Children's Choir performing in Yanyuwa at the Sydney Opera House in 2011. See also the YouTube page.
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Source: SACE Board of SA
Outline of the SACE course in Australian languages, which covers the current status of Indigenous languages, the circumstances under which they have become endangered or extinct, linguistic structure of Australian languages, and the value of Australian languages as storehouses of cultural and social knowledge.
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Source: SA Government
A policy document addressing provision and use of Aboriginal languages interpreting and translating services. The document proposes a whole-of-government framework based on principles such as the basic right of Aboriginal people to understand and be understood in their communications with government services, and the need for government to provide access to Aboriginal languages interpreters and translators to achieve this.
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Source: Noel Pearson/The Australian
Newspaper article in which Noel Pearson links reconciliation with Aboriginal languages education: " the greatest gift for a child in Australia ... is to have another language, a mother tongue, a language of the heart that is not English".
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Source: ABC
Search ABC resources through this new educational portal. The ABC is increasingly working with Indigenous people to co-produce resources including for and about languages. Use the search box to search, for example, for ‘Aboriginal languages’, which results in over 900 links to resources within the ABC's website.
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Source: National Congress of Australia
In this document, the Congress welcomes the Framework, stating that it recognises Indigenous languages and their owners or custodians, the negative impact of government policies since 1788, and the importance of languages to Australia's First Peoples, and the need for ongoing consultation in developing and implementing programs. Congress was disappointed at lack of description of the past and present state of languages and highly critical about the lack of implmentation of the 2009 National Indigenous Language Policy. [PDF, 4 pages]
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Source: Brian Devlin
The future of the discontinued NT bilingual education programs is an issue of national and international concern. This article analyses the status and future of bilingual education programs in remote NT schools. It explains why bilingual education is so contested, resulting in the current unresolved compromise in schools and a political stalemate.
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Source: University of Queensland
Analysis of phonological, morphological, syntactic and lexical semantic structures of an Australian Aboriginal language in light of some current issues in linguistic theory.
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Source: ABC Science
Article summarising Claire Bowern's research indicating that 12 different languages were spoken in Tasmania, whereas previously there had been thought to be one or two. Claire's abstract can also be viewed at the Proceedings of the Royal Society website.
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Source: Kevin Lowe / Anna Ash
Background to the rise of language revitalisation efforts in NSW, and the prominent role of the NSW Board of Studies in providing input and support.
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Source: Commonwealth Ombudsman/Australian Government
A 2011 report on improving and expanding interpreting services through providing more interpreters, with better training and availability.
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Source: Convenors: David Nash and Jane Simpson
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, April 28-29, 1998. Focussed on patterns of motion lexicalisation and description in Australian languages. Includes list of papers with links to informative abstracts.
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Source: National Library of Australia/Norman B. Tindale
Zoomable map by Norman Tindale from 1940 showing the distribution of Aboriginal groups. The map should not be taken as a correct or contemporary representation of languages or groups. However it has considerable historical value and some problems have been in the way it has been interpreted and used. On the other hand, VACL says: "When [Tindale] began that project during the 1920s the popular view was that Aboriginal groups roamed across the landscape, with no fixed territories. This map is therefore a crucial document in Australian cultural history; graphic evidence that no part of Australia was terra nullius, empty land."
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Source: South Australian Museum Archives
A detailed catalogue of Aboriginal language groups from Tindale's 1974 book Aboriginal Tribes of Australia. Information on locations, alternatives names, colonial/historical sources, and more. The catalogue is also an index to Tindale's Tribal Boundaries Map. The SA Museum's caution that the "catalogue represents Tindale's attempt to depict Aboriginal tribal distribution at the time of European contact" is itself highly problematic.
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Source: Jane Simpson et al
Articles, discussions and notices on various topics on Australian languages and linguistics. From staff at University of Sydney, PARADISEC, and others.
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Source: Norman B. Tindale/South Australian Museum
Tindale's 1974 map of Australian Indigenous groups and boundaries. It has been both highly influential and controversial. The SA Museum's caution that the "catalogue represents Tindale's attempt to depict Aboriginal tribal distribution at the time of European contact" is itself highly problematic.
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Source: Christopher Moseley / UNESCO
A list of about 2,500 endangered languages throughout the world, searchable by name, country, map, or ‘vitality’. Unfortunately the map is misleading in regard to Australia, as it excludes most of the languages of eastern and southern Australia (and ignores Tasmania).
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Source: Australian National Dictionary Centre (Australian National University)
A wordlist including many Aboriginal words and their meanings, such as boomerang.
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Source: Australian Government, Attorney-General's Department, Ministry for the Arts
Government reports and policies on Indigenous languages, including National Indigenous Languages Policy.
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Source: VACL
Prior to European contact there were approximately 36 languages spoken in the region now called Victoria. VACL is responsible for the retrieval, recording and restoration of Aboriginal languages in Victoria.
Includes VACL newsletter, maps, contacts, and other information.
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Source: WANALA
WANALA is a collaborative alliance for Aboriginal organisations, projects and activities in the west and north of Australia aimed at supporting, promoting, and teaching languages, and providing services such as interpreting and translation.
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Source: John Hobson
This paper examines issues surrounding Indigenous languages revitalisation in NSW and strategies for increasing the number of Aboriginal language teachers in the state
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Source: Wyemando Trust
Wyemando provides grants to support Aboriginal language projects in Western Australia. The site lists language organisations in WA and has other useful links.
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