What’s new

August 2016 update

Another 75 items have been added to the Virtual Library, bringing the total number of items to over 500, representing over 150 languages ... read more

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RESULTS: 12 ITEMS FOR LANGUAGE Kriol and pidgins

Kriol and pidgins [rop]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: AuSIL / Various
Web and downloadable dictionaries for Burarra, Bilinarra, Djinang, Gurindji, Iwaidja, Kriol, Martu Wangka, Maung, Tiwi, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Wik Mungkan. The page also has links to over 90 linguistic and other language-related articles.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
An illustrated story about bush medicines written in Ngalakgan, Kriol and English.
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Source: Felicity Meakins / Waleed Aly / ABC
In this interview by Waleed Aly, Felicity Meakins describes Kriol, a language spoken by about 20,000 people across northern Australia. It has regional varieties, such as Gurindji Kriol described in this interview.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
Bible texts for 14 languages. These are provided by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (in Australia branded as AuSIL) as a "ministry tool" but made openly accessible. Includes text, audio (note, some spoken by non-Aboriginal persons), concordances, and downloadable software.
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Source: Greg Dickson/The Conversation
Dickson notes that about 20,000 people speak Kriol, but it is rarely acknowledged. This very readable article gives the background to the language, argues for greater recogntition, and notes its recent emergence into the public sphere, including daily ABC news broadcasts, and a translation of Shakespear’s King Lear by Tom E. Lewis. There is also a version of Waltzing Matilda sung in Kriol (Waltjim Bat Matilda) by Ali Mills.
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Source: Nkukurr Language Centre
Contains several resources for the languages of Ngukurr, especially Kriol and Ngalakgan. With menus and navigation in Kriol.
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Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
Facebook page for the centre, with active reports, updates and conversations, mostly in Kriol. See also their innovative website at http://www.ngukurrlc.org.au/.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
The Ngukurr Language Centre aims to revitalise, document, teach and promote the traditional languages of the community via community-based language programs. The innovative site is presented in Kriol and also has information about other languages including the Ngalakgan Online Dictionary.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics/Staff of Bamyili School
Historical short film from 1981 about the English-Kriol bilingual program at Bamyili (Barunga).
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Source: Ali Mills / Skinnyfish Music
A version of Waltzing Matilda sung in Kriol.
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