What’s new

August 2016 update

Another 75 items have been added to the Virtual Library, bringing the total number of items to over 500, representing over 150 languages ... read more

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RESULTS: 154 ITEMS FOR STATE/REGION NT

Alyawarra [aly]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Source: Warlpiri Media Association/PAW Media and Communications
Media group from Yuendemu. Over 25 years of producing TV, radio and music. A key role of PAW Media is the production of media content in languages to support languages including Alyawarr, (Eastern) Arrernte, Luritja, Warumungu, Anmatyerr, Gurindji, Kaytetye, Pintubi, and Warlpiri. See the Productions page for their wide range of outputs, including Bush Mechanics.
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Amurdak [amg]
Source: Robert Mailhammer / ELAR
Archive deposit: audio and annotated texts from a range of genres, from the Minjilang community on Croker Island. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Anindilyakwa [aoi]
Source: Northern Territory Library/others
A flashcard app with 20 everyday words and phrases in Anindilyakwa and English. Also includes video of hand gestures.
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Source: Marie Van Egmond / ELAR
Archive deposit: audio plus transcriptions documenting the morpho-syntax of Enindhilyakwa (Groote Eylandt, Gulf of Carpentaria).
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Source: James Bednall/Crikey
A linguist’s experience of working with the language Anindilyakwa, providing an introduction to the Warnindilyakwa people and their language. An item from Fully (sic), Crikey’s language blog, which features several posts on Australian languages.
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Anjumarla [gue]
Source: Gerhardt Laves/David Nash
Wordlist collected by Gerhardt Laves, modified and presented by David Nash. This language is similar to Gurindji.
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Anmatyerr [amx]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: PAW media
IndigiTUBE channel for accessing PAW content. Easy access to over 80 songs from the PAW communities and in the PAW languages
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Arrernte [aus-x-arq]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: CDU
A 2 year course providing knowledge and skills for culturally informed language work, documentation, maintenance, recovery and revitalisation. Students also learn the basics of an Indigenous language (Yolngu or Arrernte), and understand how language is embedded within culture. The course prepares students for professional practice and further study in language and linguistics, and in Indigenous language planning and policy at local and national levels.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Christobel Swann
Christobel Swann is a Conservationist who works as an Aboriginal Linguist in Alice Springs. She gives a personal and community perspective on the state of languages, especially her own, southern Arrernte.
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Bininj Gun-wok [gup]
Source: Bininj Kunwok Language Project
Facebook page for the Bininj Kunwok Language Project, with news and postings in both Bininj Kunwok and English.
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Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Burarra [bvr]
Source: Kathleen Glasgow and David Glasgow/AuSIL
Dictionary consists of approximately 4000 headwords. Burarra is spoken by the Burarra and Gun-nartpa people (approximately 600 speakers) in the Blyth and Cadell River regions and in the town of Maningrida in North-Central Arnhem Land.
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Source: ARDS
Background information and 900-word dictionary of the Dhaŋu languages of Yolŋu matha -- (Wangurri, Gälpu, Golumala). See also the English-Dhaŋu wordlist.
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Source: Margaret Carew / ELAR
Archive deposit: recordings of Gun-nartpa (a Burarra dialect) speakers in the Cadell river region of north-central Arnhem Land from a range of ages. Time-aligned annotations will be added. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols, and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: ARDS
English wordlist for the Dhaŋu Dictionary.
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Source: Batchelor Institute/Centre for Australian Languages & Linguistics
A range of materials for Burarra, Ndjébbana, Kuninjku, Gurr-goni, Djinaŋ and other languages of the Maningrida area, including links to dictionaries, wordlists, story books and learning materials - many online. Also see a bibliography (PDF).
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Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Source: Marion Waiguma / Margaret Carew
A short film in which Marion Waiguma and Margaret Carew talk about their work in Burarra language from Maningrida, Arnhem Land.
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Dalabon [ngk]
Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Djambarrpuyngu [djr]
Source: ARDS/Aboriginal Interpreter Service/North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency
A downloadable PDF containing detalled descriptions and translations of legal terms in plain English and in Yolŋu Matha. A translation of the The Plain English Legal Dictionary into Djambarrpuyŋu, the main Yolŋu dialect spoken in the Arnhem Land townships of Galiwin’ku, Gapuwiyak, Milingimbi and Ramingining.
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Djangu [dhg]
Source: ARDS
Background information and 900-word dictionary of the Dhaŋu languages of Yolŋu matha -- (Wangurri, Gälpu, Golumala). See also the English-Dhaŋu wordlist.
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Source: ARDS
English wordlist for the Dhaŋu Dictionary.
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Djinang [dji]
Source: Richard Birrinbirrin/YouTube
Richard Birrinbirrin speaks in Djinang about Djirrididi body painting and relates part of the Djan’kawu Sisters’ story. Richard starred in the film Ten Canoes and is an artist, songman and community leader at Ramingining.
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Eastern Arrernte [aer]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Golpa [lja]
Source: Juliane Kabisch-Lindenlaub / ELAR
Archive deposit: resources for an annotated and illustrated Golpa (Elcho Island, NT) story book based on audio recordings made in the 1960s by B. Schebeck and more recent recordings by the depositor. The narrator of the older texts is the father of today’s Golpa consultants. Narratives focus on a description of the languages used by different clans in the Ganba?tji area (comprising Elcho Island, Wessel Islands and Cape Wessels). Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Gun-nartpa [bvr]
Source: Batchelor Institute/Centre for Australian Languages & Linguistics
A range of materials for Burarra, Ndjébbana, Kuninjku, Gurr-goni, Djinaŋ and other languages of the Maningrida area, including links to dictionaries, wordlists, story books and learning materials - many online. Also see a bibliography (PDF).
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Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Gundjeihmi [gup]
Source: Shellie Morris/City of Palmerston
From 2 minutes in, Shellie sings in her sister’s mother’s language Gundjeihmi.
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Gunwinygu [gup]
Source: Bininj Gunwok project
Bininj Gunwok refers to six mutually intelligible dialects stretching from Kakadu National Park south to Pine Creek and Manyallaluk, and east across the Arnhem Land plateau. This site has a wonderful array of information about Kunwinjku and related languages, including maps, texts, grammar, phrases with audio, publications, and photos. Notably, all the menus and much of the information is in Kunwinjku.
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Source: Bininj Kunwok Language Project
Facebook page for the Bininj Kunwok Language Project, with news and postings in both Bininj Kunwok and English.
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Source: Bininj Kunwok Language Project
A place for reading and writing in Kunwinjku, Kundjeyhmi, Kuninjku and Mayali and for photos & stories from Kakadu and Western Arnhem Land.
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Source: CSIRO
Kunwinjku people recognise and name 6 seasons. Traditional Owners from Kunbarlanja (Gunbalanya) in western Arnhem Land have documented Kunwinjku knowledge of the seasons and the environment in a calendar.
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Source: Murray Garde/Land Rights News
An account from Murray Garde about language misunderstandings between government representatives and Kunwinjku-speaking Bininj people about township leasing at Gunbalanya leading to serious misrepresentation of the wishes of the community and traditional owners.
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Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Gupapuyngu [guf]
Source: ARDS
Navigable hypertext dictionary of Gupapuyŋu, also includes English to Gupapuyŋu finderlist.
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Source: Glottolog
Glottolog’s resource page for Gupapuyngu, a Yolngu language of NT. The page shows Gupapuyngu’s location on a map, its place within its language family, and a large number of references for the language (most are harvested from bibliographic sources and the items are not necessarily online). See also the main Glottolog page.
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Source: Yolngu people / Yasunori Hayashi
Site with a range of information about Yolngu culture, language, placenames, and about 30 songs. The whole site may be viewed in Yolngu matha, English, or Japanese. Note: the media may require browser plugins.
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Source: Michael Christie, Waymamba Gaykamaŋu and David Nathan/CDU
The Gupapuyŋu app is part of the courseware developed for teaching Yolŋu languages and culture at Charles Darwin University. It was first released in 2001 as a CD-ROM based application. Version 3.0 has been completely redesigned, with many usability improvements, and updated to run on the latest Windows and Macintosh operating systems.
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Source: Film Australia
A historical film by Film Australia, made in 1975, about the establishment of bilingual programs in NT schools. It shows a bilingual education program in Millingimbi, NT, with commentary by Beulah Lowe. Another segment shows Warlpiri literacy learning in Yuendemu, and Pintupi in Yayayi near Papunya.
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Source: Galiwin’ku community/Teabba Media
A short film where members of the Galiwin’u community recount and re-enact in story and song an incident from the 1960’s when six year old twin boys from Elcho Island, were hunting with their family and got lost for 3 days and nights.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
A unique dictionary that has multiple methods for lookup, including ‘fuzzy spelling’, substring search, English finderlist etc. Many of the entries have audio pronunciation.
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Gurindji [gue]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Gurindji community members/Karungkarni Art
A Facebook community group page (‘just the start of this little language centre’) for Gurindji language, and for sharing resources and ideas for language at Kalkaringi/ Daguragu.
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Gurindji Kriol [aus-x-gkq]
Source: Felicity Meakins / ELAR
Archive deposit: audio and video recordings of Gurindji Kriol, which fuses Gurindji with Kriol. It is an important language for younger Gurindji people, and is significant linguistically, with a rarely-observed mixed structure. Gurindji Kriol is increasingly being replaced by Kriol among Gurindji teenagers. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Iwaidja [ibd]
Source: Iwaidja Inyman
A community project based on Croker Island which documents, maintains, preserves and promotes Iwaidja and other endangered languages of the local region (Amurdak, Marrku). Has a great range of books in/about languages, music, photos, phone app, and videos in languages.
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Source: Joy Williams Malwagag and Sabina Hoeng
A short film where senior Iwaidja speaker Ngalwangardi aju Minjilang (1946-2012) talks in Iwaidja about the pressure on her language. She describes consequences of the 2009 policy of the Northern Territory Department of Education and Training to marginalize the use of indigenous languages in schools.
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Source: Noreen Pym and Bonnie Larrimore/AuSIL
Dictionary consists of approximately 1600 headwords. Iwaidja is spoken by around 150 people on Croker Island and the Cobourg Peninsula in Western Arnhem Land.
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Source: Minjilang Endangered Languages Publication project/Bruce Birch
The Ma! Iwaidja app is an initiative of the Minjilang Endangered Languages Publication project (Iwaidja Inyman), based on Croker Island NT. One of the first mobile apps for an Australian language, it has words and audio for Iwaidja vocabulary and phrases, and also allows users to produce and upload additional material.
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Source: Iwaidja Inyman
A site for sharing information about Iwaidja issues and language. Has some nice illustrated wordlists for plants and birds.
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Jawoyn [djn]
Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Kaytetye [gbb]
Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Kriol and pidgins [rop]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
An illustrated story about bush medicines written in Ngalakgan, Kriol and English.
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Source: Felicity Meakins / Waleed Aly / ABC
In this interview by Waleed Aly, Felicity Meakins describes Kriol, a language spoken by about 20,000 people across northern Australia. It has regional varieties, such as Gurindji Kriol described in this interview.
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Source: Greg Dickson/The Conversation
Dickson notes that about 20,000 people speak Kriol, but it is rarely acknowledged. This very readable article gives the background to the language, argues for greater recogntition, and notes its recent emergence into the public sphere, including daily ABC news broadcasts, and a translation of Shakespear’s King Lear by Tom E. Lewis. There is also a version of Waltzing Matilda sung in Kriol (Waltjim Bat Matilda) by Ali Mills.
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Source: Nkukurr Language Centre
Contains several resources for the languages of Ngukurr, especially Kriol and Ngalakgan. With menus and navigation in Kriol.
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Source: Maïa Ponsonnet
Linguist Maïa Ponsonnet’s page with some background and references for Bininj Gun-wok, Jawoyn, Rembarrnga and Kriol.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
Facebook page for the centre, with active reports, updates and conversations, mostly in Kriol. See also their innovative website at http://www.ngukurrlc.org.au/.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
The Ngukurr Language Centre aims to revitalise, document, teach and promote the traditional languages of the community via community-based language programs. The innovative site is presented in Kriol and also has information about other languages including the Ngalakgan Online Dictionary.
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Source: Summer Institute of Linguistics/Staff of Bamyili School
Historical short film from 1981 about the English-Kriol bilingual program at Bamyili (Barunga).
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Source: Ali Mills / Skinnyfish Music
A version of Waltzing Matilda sung in Kriol.
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Larrakia [lrg]
Source: CSIRO
Members of the Gulumoerrgin (Larrakia) language group, from the Darwin and surrounding region in the Northern Territory, worked with CSIRO to create a calendar using their seasonal knowledge, which divides the year into 7 seasons. See also Larrakia Calendar.
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Source: CSIRO
Intreactive calendar describing seasons with their prominent plants and animals. Includes teachers’ resources and downloadable posters and data sheets.
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Luritja/Pintupi [piu]
Source: Dan Harrison, Ted Egan, children from Killara School (Sydney) and Ntaria School (Hermannsburg)
The Australian National Anthem translated into Luritja by Alison Nararula Anderson and Ted Egan, and sung by children from Sydney’s Killara School and Ntaria School in Hermannsburg. See also the SMH article for more audio of learning the song and background story, and the article at Alice Online.
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Source: Film Australia
A historical film by Film Australia, made in 1975, about the establishment of bilingual programs in NT schools. It shows a bilingual education program in Millingimbi, NT, with commentary by Beulah Lowe. Another segment shows Warlpiri literacy learning in Yuendemu, and Pintupi in Yayayi near Papunya.
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Source: PAW media
IndigiTUBE channel for accessing PAW content. Easy access to over 80 songs from the PAW communities and in the PAW languages
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Source: United Nations High Commission for Human Rights/ANU/L. Macdonald/S.J Dixon/S. Holcombe/K. Hansen
A translation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into Pintupi/Luritja, its first translation into an Australian language. See the news articles from ANU and the ABC. The translation is also available at from ANU. (See also http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Pages/Language.aspx?LangID=piu
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MalakMalak [mpb]
Source: CSIRO
MalakMalak traditional owners from the Daly River region in the Northern Territory worked with CSIRO to create a seasonal calendar of plant knowledge,describes food and medicine plants and the MalakMalak seasons when they are collected.
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Mawng [mph]
Source: Ruth Singer / ELAR
Archive deposit: focussed on dictionary definitions of triangular kinship terms and names for flora and fauna and associated knowledge. The deposit also includes audio recordings of myths and stories about traditional customs. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols, and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Ruth Singer/Mawng Ngaralk/Storytellers
A revised Mawng-English dictionary, information about the Mawng language spoken on Warruwi (South Goulbourn Island), and many videos and sound recordings of stories told by Mawng speakers.
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Source: Ruth Singer/Isabel O’Keefe/Elizabeth Langslow/Janet Mardbinda/others
Mawng-English dictionary (as online interactive or as downloadable PDF, together with English-Mawng finderlist), together with many video and audio stories videos and sound recordings. Also some downladable posters on fish, shells and plant medicine.
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Source: Sam Hellmuth, Frank Kügler & Ruth Singer
Descriptive and theoretical results of a corpus-based phonetic study of pitch accent in Mawng (Goulburn Islands, NT).
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Murrinh-Patha [mwf]
Source: Lysbeth Ford and Dominic McCormack
The Glossary shows non-Murrinhpatha speakers (including judges, lawyers, police etc) how English legal terms are rendered in Murrinhpatha. It is also a tool for Murrinhpatha legal interpreters and the people of the Thamarrurr region. Written in in collaboration with Wadeye elders Frank Dumoo and Claude Narjic, it is based on earlier work by Michael Walsh and Chester Street. See also this associated paper.
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Source: Wadeye Community/TRAAC Adult Education program
An introductory guide to some words and phrases of Murrinhpatha, the main language spoken at Wadeye, Northern Territory. The content is conveniently organised by theme and place, e.g. Health Clinic, Shop etc. and includes audio.
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Source: School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Rachel’s page contains links to papers on the syntax of Aboriginal languages, including a grammar and learner’s guide for Wambaya, and several papers on Murrinh-Patha
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Source: Wadeye Aboriginal Community, NT
Clan names and their languages at Wadeye (Port Keats).
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Source: Linda Barwick/Allan Marett/Michael Walsh/Joe Blythe/Nick Reid/Lysbeth Ford
This site documents the history, language and music of public songs and dances composed and performed at Wadeye, NT (aka Port Keats). You can search the database, listen to songs and see information about the singers, translations, and other musicological documentation. Some of the recordings are for community access only or are not publicly available, but you can apply for access. See also the Murrinh-Patha song project description.
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Ndjebbana [djj]
Source: Batchelor Institute/Centre for Australian Languages & Linguistics
A range of materials for Burarra, Ndjébbana, Kuninjku, Gurr-goni, Djinaŋ and other languages of the Maningrida area, including links to dictionaries, wordlists, story books and learning materials - many online. Also see a bibliography (PDF).
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Source: Margaret Carew/Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
A program supporting languages spoken in Maningrida, one of the most multilingual communities in the world, through innovative projects such as Bininy Gunwok Names for Plants and Animals, Maningrida Community Stories (using the Ara Irititja archive system), and various films and other publications.
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Source: Glenn Auld
Application of computer assisted learning among the Kunibidji, focusing on the use of electronic talking books in Ndjébbana displayed on touch-screens, to look at the potential for language learning and cultural understanding.
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Ngaanyatjarra [ntj]
Source: NPY Women’s Council’s Ngangkari Program/Central Australia Mental Health Service
This page hosts a downlodable PDF document called Uti Kulintjaku: A compendium of words for talking about mental health. It includes terms in Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra, as well as translations from English into these languages.
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Ngalakan [nig]
Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
An illustrated story about bush medicines written in Ngalakgan, Kriol and English.
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Source: Nkukurr Language Centre
Contains several resources for the languages of Ngukurr, especially Kriol and Ngalakgan. With menus and navigation in Kriol.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
Comprehensive interactive dictionary. The site includes an English to Ngalakgan dictonary and a Ngalakgan Thesaurus.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
The Ngukurr Language Centre aims to revitalise, document, teach and promote the traditional languages of the community via community-based language programs. The innovative site is presented in Kriol and also has information about other languages including the Ngalakgan Online Dictionary.
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Source: Ngukurr Language Centre
A variety of downloadable learning resources for Ngalakgan.
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Ngan’gi [nam]
Source:
Ngan’gi knowledge holders from the Nauiyu Nambiyu community in the Daly River region NT worked with CSIRO to create a seasonal calendar. The calendar identifies the 13 seasons, which are named according to speargrass life stages, and represents a wealth of Indigenous ecological knowledge. [Unfortunately the link to the season poster is currently broken - January 2016]
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Pitjantjatjara [pjt]
Source: Ngapartji Ngapartji
A result of the Pitjantjatjara art-language project Ngapartji Ngapartji that was run on Arrernte country in Mparntwe (Alice Springs).

See also site at http://ninti.ngapartji.org/, where you can register for free and take 20 simple language lessons.

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Source: Wilfried Baumgarten
Two short articles on Pitjantjatjara demonstratives and transitivity
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Source: NPY Women’s Council’s Ngangkari Program/Central Australia Mental Health Service
This page hosts a downlodable PDF document called Uti Kulintjaku: A compendium of words for talking about mental health. It includes terms in Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra, as well as translations from English into these languages.
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Source: Ara Irititja Project
Ara Irititja brings back home materials of cultural and historical significance to Anangu (Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara people of Central Australia). These include photographs, films, sound recordings and documents. Ara Irititja has designed a digital archive to store repatriated materials and other contemporary items.
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Sign languages [aus-x-siq]
Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Tiwi [tiw]
Source: ABC/Andrew Denton
Interview with Ted Egan, the Administrator of the Northern Territory. Ted speaks about how he learnt Tiwi from Aloysius Puantulura. Is Ted the first non-Aboriginal executive to speak an Australian language? (Sir Douglas Nicholls was the Aboriginal Governor of South Australia and was a "Dja Dja Wurrung, Wotjoboluk, and Yupagalk man" [http://www.vaeai.org.au/timeline/1901.html]).
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Source: Ngarukuruwala
A new Tiwi song created by the elders and children of the Tiwi Islands (YouTube video).
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Source: The Wangatunga Strong Women’s Group/Genevieve Campbell/Teresita Puruntatameri
A website of Tiwi songs. You can hear songs on the MP3 jukebox, read about the singers, their songs, crafts, and their community at Wurrumiyanga, Bathurst Island.
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Source: Jenny Lee/AuSIL
Dictionary consists of approximately 5000 headwords. Tiwi is spoken by approximately 1500 speakers on Bathurst and Melville Islands.
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Source: CSIRO
Traditional Owners from the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin in the Northern Territory, worked with CSIRO to create a calendar of Tiwi seasonal ecological knowledge and a calendar of plants and animals. The Tiwi people have 3 main seasons and 13 minor seasons in their calendar.
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Source: Justin Puruntatameri/Teabba media
Justin Puruntatameri witnessed events of World War II from the Tiwi Islands. Tiwi people saw Japanese planes overhead and tried to send Darwin a warning. Shortly after, Darwin was bombed. Justin Puruntatameri documents this history, together with Tiwi dance and song.
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Wagiman [waq]
Source: Wikipedia
A Wikipedia article on the Wagiman language. Wikipedia has an increasing number of pages on Indigenous languages. They can be useful sources, but vary greatly in quality and tend to be rather oriented toward technical linguistic description. This Wagiman page is one of the most comprehensive of them.
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Source: Stephen Wilson, University of Sydney
Comprehensive dictionary, texts, and other information about Wagiman, a language of the Northern Territory. Searchable in English and Wagiman.
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Source: CSIRO
Members of the Wagiman language group from the Daly River in the Northern Territory worked with CSIRO to create a calendar of key Wagiman plants and animals.
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Walmajarri [wmt]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Wambaya [wmb]
Source: School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne
Rachel’s page contains links to papers on the syntax of Aboriginal languages, including a grammar and learner’s guide for Wambaya, and several papers on Murrinh-Patha
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Warlpiri [wbp]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Steve from the Alice
The text of a Warlpiri translation of the Christian hymn Amazing Grace.
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Source: Myfany Turpin / ELAR
Archive deposit: documentation of 28 different Arandic song series and/or song styles from the northern Arandic group of languages of Central Australia, including Arandic people’s interpretations of the songs and their broader meanings, and linguistic and musical features of the performances and the song interpretations. Represents languages Kaytetye, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr, Eastern Arrernte and Warlpiri. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols and access may require negotiation with the depositor.
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Source: Margaret Carew/Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics, Batchelor Institute
A program supporting Central Australian languages through innovative projects such as the Kaytetye Bird App and the Iltyem-iltyem website for teaching and learning Central Australian sign languages, and many more resources for Arrernte, Warlpiri, Alyawarr, Anmatyerr and other languages.
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Source: ABC
Four Corners documentary about effects of government’s scrapping of bilingual education in the NT.
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Source: Batchelor Institute / Jenny Green / Sign language consultants
An online resource for teaching and learning the sign languages used in Indigenous communities in Central Australia. This site contains several hundred video clips of signs. The project was piloted by members of the sign language team from Ti Tree in Central Australia. You need to register (free) to access the sign dictionaries.
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Source: ABC / Aboriginal Interpreter Service
The ABC, with the help of the Aboriginal Interpreter Service (NT), is trialling an Indigenous language News Service in Warlpiri and Yolngu Matha. Two ABC news bulletins are recorded each weekday. The daily bulletins can be heard on this page, with recent bulletins on SoundCloud, and on some Indigenous radio stations.
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Source: PAW Media/Jason Japaljarri Woods/students from Yuendumu School
An animated story book used as a Warlpiri literacy resource for young children at Yuendumu School.
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Source: Kevin Jansz, Christopher Manning, and Nitin Indurkhya
A unique graphical-browsing semantic dictionary aimed at the needs of native speakers and children, as well as being useful to professional linguists.
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Source: PAW Media/Henry Jakamarra Cook
Innovative storytelling using video and animation. It tells about when Warlpiri came across a European camp and found alternative uses for their tents. Animated by Jason Japaljarri Woods using sand drawing, clay and found objects.
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Source: PAW Media/June Napanangka Granites/Jason Japaljarri Woods
An animated short story about Sitting in the humpy during the rain.
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Source: Film Australia
A historical film by Film Australia, made in 1975, about the establishment of bilingual programs in NT schools. It shows a bilingual education program in Millingimbi, NT, with commentary by Beulah Lowe. Another segment shows Warlpiri literacy learning in Yuendemu, and Pintupi in Yayayi near Papunya.
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Source: The New Daily
Bess Nungarrayi Price has defied the Northern Territory parliament to deliver a speech in Warlpiri. Ms price said ‘My first language is Warlpiri which is one of the family of languages that came to this land 50,000 years ago, tens of millennia before Arthur Phillip and the First Fleet.’
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Source: Warlpiri Media Association
Website for the "Bush Mechanics" TV series. Includes games and videos, some in the Warlpiri language. Information on how to obtain the excellent "Bush Mechanics" videos.
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Source: PAW media
IndigiTUBE channel for accessing PAW content. Easy access to over 80 songs from the PAW communities and in the PAW languages
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Source: Batchelor Press/Batchelor Institute
Information and resources about innovative ‘sound printed’ books developed through the Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics. Catalogue of talking books, plus information about the technology and downloadable audio.
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Source: Carmel O’Shannessy / ELAR
Archive deposit: six traditional Warlpiri love songs, called yilpinji, sung by Teddy Morrison Jupurrurla, and two ceremonial initiation songs, sung by Peter Dixon Japanangka and a group of elder men. Includes transcribed and translated video and audio files.
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Source: PAW media/Alice Nampijinpa Hanwood/Margaret Napangardi Brown/Norbert Japaljarri Morris/Micah Japanangka Williams
Innovative storytelling using video and animation. The story is an Emu Dreaming from Nyirripi.
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Source: PAW media/Neville "Cobra" Japangardi Poulson/Jason Japaljarri Woods
An animated story explaining how crows, which were once white, came to be black.
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Source: David Nash
Resources and links for Warlpiri.The most comprehensive web resource for any single Australian language. See also David Nash’s Home Page.
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Source: Steve Swartz/AuSIL
Warlpiri is spoken by about 3000 people in the Tanami Desert area. See also the About Warlpiri page for background to the dictionary.
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Source: PAW Media/Kathy Nangala Sampson/Jeannie Nampijimpa Presley/Maggie Napangardi Williams/Marissa Nangala Brown/Renita Napanangka McCormack/Danielle Napaljarri Colli
An animated story told by senior Willowra women at a place nearby the Willowra community. It tells the story of a Bush Turkey that travels around in search of women.
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Warumungu [wrm]
Source: Patrick McConvell, Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth
Research following 5-10 children and their families in 3 communities from 2004-2007, to study the language input children receive in multilingual environments. Languages include Gurindji, Kriol, Walmajarri, Warlpiri and Warramungu. See also the second phase of the project which focuses on language issues when children enter the formal school system.
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Source: Eduardo Avila / Global Voices
The radio program and audio podcast Pinarra Aku created by Kathy Burns and Rosemary Plummer, a teacher and traditional owner, teaches children from the Barkly region about Warumungu language and culture. This page has links to streaming and downloadable audio programs.
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Source: Jane Simpson
This article describes strategies used by Warumungu speakers to create new words and ways of expressing new concepts. Originally published as: Simpson, Jane. 1985. How Warumungu people express new concepts. Language in Central Australia 4:12-25
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Source: Kathy Burns/RosemaryPlummer/Barkly Regional Arts
Pinarra Aku is a children’s language radio show, teaching Warumungu language. Several language learning episodes together with teaching guides.
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Source: David Nash
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Yan-nhangu [jay]
Source: Claire Bowern and the Yan-nhaŋu team
A guide for learning Yan-nhaŋu, originally written for a 2010 class on Aboriginal languages at Yale University. Downloadable, with a ‘name your own price’ policy (including free).
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Source: Claire Bowern / ELAR
Archive deposit: over 140 audio and video recordings of speakers of Yan-nhaŋu, made at Milingimbi, Arnhem Land, during fieldwork in 2007. Includes some translations into English and Djambarrpuyngu. Genres include conversation, translation, elicitation and narration. Like all ELAR deposits, this material is accessible according to access protocols, and access may require negotiation with the depositor. See also >a href="http://elar.soas.ac.uk/deposit/0046">additional deposit for Yan-nhangu.
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Yankunytjatjara [kdd]
Source: NPY Women’s Council’s Ngangkari Program/Central Australia Mental Health Service
This page hosts a downlodable PDF document called Uti Kulintjaku: A compendium of words for talking about mental health. It includes terms in Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra, as well as translations from English into these languages.
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Yanyuwa [jao]
Source: Monash Indigenous Centre
Animated stories to assist Elders and younger generations in the sharing and preservation of stories that combine Yanyuwa (and other communities’) history, knowledge, poetry, songs, performance and language; "a living archive that is a decolonised space in which communities are happy to see their material stored".
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Source: Monash University
A collaboration between Monash Indigenous Centre and others including IT and animators, this site aims to show “how best to construct a living archive that is a decolonised space in which communities are happy to see their material stored.” It features 8 compelling animations accompanied by voiceovers in Yanyuwa.
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Source: John Bradley/Monash University
Presentation about the long term project documenting the Yanyuwa language and culture through animation that is both culturally appropriate as well as effective for revitalisation. See also Monash Country Lines Archive to view the animations and for further information.
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Source: Shellie Morris and the Borroloola Songwomen
Shellie Morris and the Borroloola Songwomen with the Gondwana National Indigenous Children’s Choir performing Waliwaliyangu li-Anthawirriyarra a-Kurija - Saltwater People Song, at the 2011 Deadly Awards in the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera House. See also The Song Peoples Sessions and The Age article.
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Source: John Bradley and Jean Kirton
Dictionary and cultural resource that includes Yanyuwa-English and English-Yanyuwa dictionary, text, maps, illustrations and bibliography.
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Yolngu [aus-x-yoq]
Source: Michael Christie and Helen Verran (editors)
Issue of Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts with a variety of papers on Yolngu culture and language, including topics such as language learning, translation, and intellectual property.
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Source: ARDS
Navigable hypertext dictionary of Gupapuyŋu, also includes English to Gupapuyŋu finderlist.
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Source: CDU
A 2 year course providing knowledge and skills for culturally informed language work, documentation, maintenance, recovery and revitalisation. Students also learn the basics of an Indigenous language (Yolngu or Arrernte), and understand how language is embedded within culture. The course prepares students for professional practice and further study in language and linguistics, and in Indigenous language planning and policy at local and national levels.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
The course provides Indigenous and non-Indigenous students with theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to engage in culturally informed language work, in particular the maintenance, reclamation and revitalisation of Australian Indigenous languages. It includes units in general descriptive and theoretical linguistics, sociolinguistics with particular reference to language and identity, language endangerment and language revitalisation, language planning and policy in relation to Australian Indigenous languages, practical application of linguistic study such as language teaching materials, how languages are embedded within diverse cultural context and cultural ownership, and acc
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Source: Stephen Page, Wayne Blair & Kathy Balngayngu Marika
A play about life in Arnhem Land, performed in the Yolngu language and "snatches of Pidgin English". Was performed by the Sydney Theatre Company.
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Source: Michael Christie
The author argues that digital forms like databases and metadata are not culturally neutral; they typically opaquely encode assumptions about structure and representation, and how one interacts with them. By revealing these assumptions, Yolngu (Aboriginal) forms of knowledge and literacy can be applied to database design and deployment; however ‘long term, deeply negotiated and collaborative processes where questions of the nature, politics and creation of knowledge remain central.’
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Source: ARDS
Background information and 900-word dictionary of the Dhaŋu languages of Yolŋu matha -- (Wangurri, Gälpu, Golumala). See also the English-Dhaŋu wordlist.
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Source: ARDS/Aboriginal Interpreter Service/North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency
A downloadable PDF containing detalled descriptions and translations of legal terms in plain English and in Yolŋu Matha. A translation of the The Plain English Legal Dictionary into Djambarrpuyŋu, the main Yolŋu dialect spoken in the Arnhem Land townships of Galiwin’ku, Gapuwiyak, Milingimbi and Ramingining.
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Source: ARDS
A dictionary of anatomy (the human body) in Yolŋu Matha and English. Has extensive definitions in Yolŋu Matha; also contains information on polite word choices.
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Source: Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu
Live acoustic solo of Gurrumul’s international hit song in Gumay, a Yolngu language. (YouTube video)
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Source: ARDS
English wordlist for the Dhaŋu Dictionary.
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Source: Glottolog
Glottolog’s resource page for Gupapuyngu, a Yolngu language of NT. The page shows Gupapuyngu’s location on a map, its place within its language family, and a large number of references for the language (most are harvested from bibliographic sources and the items are not necessarily online). See also the main Glottolog page.
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Source: Yolngu people / Yasunori Hayashi
Site with a range of information about Yolngu culture, language, placenames, and about 30 songs. The whole site may be viewed in Yolngu matha, English, or Japanese. Note: the media may require browser plugins.
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Source: Michael Christie, Waymamba Gaykamaŋu and David Nathan/CDU
The Gupapuyŋu app is part of the courseware developed for teaching Yolŋu languages and culture at Charles Darwin University. It was first released in 2001 as a CD-ROM based application. Version 3.0 has been completely redesigned, with many usability improvements, and updated to run on the latest Windows and Macintosh operating systems.
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Source: Michael Christie / Helen Verran / Waymamba Gaykamangu
This project ran from 2003-6 and investigated ‘digital systems which support indigenous people building collective memory’ with a focus on Yolngu peoples. See in particular the publications page for a large number of interesting papers about digital technologies and Aboriginal knowledge.
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Source: ABC / Aboriginal Interpreter Service
The ABC, with the help of the Aboriginal Interpreter Service (NT), is trialling an Indigenous language News Service in Warlpiri and Yolngu Matha. Two ABC news bulletins are recorded each weekday. The daily bulletins can be heard on this page, with recent bulletins on SoundCloud, and on some Indigenous radio stations.
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Source: ABC/Alyssa Betts
The community of Galiwin’ku on Elcho Island want to use their language’s spelling system to write street signs and their own names. Their language, Yolŋu Matha (Yolngu language), has a small number of letters not used in standard English (but which are perfectly available in all writing technologies, since they are part of the International Unicode standard). Community members believe their language is being snubbed and weakened, while the NT Place Names Committee argue that only standard English can be used, despite claiming to support a Dual Naming Policy.
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Source: Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre, Yirrkala
Beautifully produced audio and video of performances by various artists, in Yolngu languages.
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Source: Film Australia
A historical film by Film Australia, made in 1975, about the establishment of bilingual programs in NT schools. It shows a bilingual education program in Millingimbi, NT, with commentary by Beulah Lowe. Another segment shows Warlpiri literacy learning in Yuendemu, and Pintupi in Yayayi near Papunya.
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Source: Indigemedia Inc, Christensen Fund, South Australian Film Corporation and Screen Australia
The award winning movie Twelve Canoes,directors Rolf de Heer and Peter Djigirr and starring members of the Ramingining community, speaking various Yolngu languages (see Wikipedia entry for more details . You can choose to view in either Yolngu or English. There are additional support materials, a study guide etc.
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Source: Galiwin’ku community/Teabba Media
A short film where members of the Galiwin’u community recount and re-enact in story and song an incident from the 1960’s when six year old twin boys from Elcho Island, were hunting with their family and got lost for 3 days and nights.
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Source: Yirrkala residents/Museum of Australian Democracy
Image of famous petition now in Australian Parliament House. See also Bark petitions: Indigenous art and reform for the rights of Indigenous Australians.
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Source: Beulah Lowe/ARDS
200 page dictionary with 4000 entries, mostly in the Gupapuyŋu dialect of Yolŋu Matha. Includes information on pronunciation and basic grammar.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
CDU teaches tertiary level units in Yolngu languages and culture. Course advisors include senior Yolngu people from Darwin, Milingimbi, Galiwin’ku, Yirrkala, Gapuwiyak, and Ramingining. Courses including Introduction to Yolngu Languages and Culture, and Yolngu Matha conversation can be taken by distance education using the WWW.
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Source: Charles Darwin University, School of Indigenous Knowledges and Public Policy
A place for Yolŋu and Balanda to learn about Yolŋu life and language. Has links to research and courses. See also Yolngu Studies and Research.
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Source: ARDS Aboriginal Resource and Development Services
Online catalogue of publications for purchase for learning Yolngu languages and associated topics such as legal and health dictionaries, and many music titles.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
Innovative dictionary covering most of the Yolngu languages and providing a variety of search methods, including Fuzzy Search, Filter Find, and English Finderlist. Many of the Yolngu words have audio pronunciation.
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Source: ARDS
A community radio station broadcast in the languages of the Yolngu people, to six communities and 30 homelands in northeast Arnhem Land, Darwin and Palmerston. In many of the homelands Yolngu radio is the only freely available media provider.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
A unique dictionary that has multiple methods for lookup, including ‘fuzzy spelling’, substring search, English finderlist etc. Many of the entries have audio pronunciation.
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Source: Yothu Yindi
One of the oldest Aboriginal sites on the Web. Hear song clips and greetings from Mandawuy Yunupingu in his language Gumatj .
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Many languages or language not specified
Source: NT Government/AIS
The AIS has 30 staff and 400 casuals covering 100 languages and dialects in the region. The site has information about interpreter training, and when and how to book an interpreter
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Source: NT Department of Local Government and Community Services
The Aboriginal Interpreter Service (AIS) facilitates communication between service providers and Aboriginal people who do not speak English as a first language. The service has 300 registered interpreters covering more than 100 Aboriginal languages and dialects spoken in the Northern Territory. See also map and information about NT Aboriginal languages.
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Source: Aboriginal Interpreter Service NT / NT Government
The Aboriginal Interpreter Service (AIS) facilitates communication between service providers and Aboriginal people who do not speak English as a first language. The service has 300 registered interpreters covering more than 100 Aboriginal languages and dialects spoken in the Northern Territory. See also their map and information about NT Aboriginal languages.
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Source: D Nathan et al
Misc collected responses in 1999 to the NT Government’s policy to phase out bilingual education in the Territory.
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Source: Manikay.com
Includes historical song recordings in Warlpiri and other NT languages. Links to many other artists singing in Indigenous languages. See also list of Arnhem Land recordings.
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Source: Batchelor Press
Batchelor Press is the publishing arm of Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education. Batchelor Institute develops teaching and learning resources primarily for Indigenous students in remote communities, where most students have English as a second or third language. These resources are developed by community elders, students and teaching staff.
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Source: various
Selection of resources created after the NT Government announced that Bilingual Education Programmes would be axed in 1999.
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Source: Brian Devlin / ABC
Claims that students in NT schools with bilingual programs performed worse than other students in skills tests were used by the NT Government to dismantle bilingual programs in schools. This paper considers - and rejects - those claims.
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Source: CAAMA
The Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA) produces, broadcasts and sells Indigenous media content, including radio, music and film - many in the languages of the region and also some languages further afield.
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Source: Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
The Centre for Australian Languages and Linguistics (CALL) is a community-focussed provider of Indigenous languages documentation, research, training, and publishing services.
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Source: Charles Darwin University
A course providing linguistic skills for appropriate and culturally sensitive language documentation, maintenance and language recovery and revitalisation. The course prepares students for community language work and further study in linguistics.
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Source: Friends of Bilingual Learning
Friends of Bilingual Learning supports the development of the Northern Territory as a multilingual society acknowledging communication through Indigenous languages and English. FOBL formed in 2008 in response to the everyday struggle that Indigenous people experience such as disproportionate representation within the judicial, welfare and health systems, and constant negative media about poor educational attendance and outcomes. The site includes news items and links to materials about multilingualism and Indigenous languages in education.
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Source: Jane Simpson, Jo Caffery, and Patrick McConvell
AIATSIS Discussion Paper (2009) of the Northern Territory government’s policy changes withdrawing the teaching of Indigenous languages in schools. Also available from ResearchGate.
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Source: NT Aboriginal Interpreter Service
Map and list of most widely spoken Aboriginal languages in the NT. Also listed by region and community/place name.
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Source: ABC/Thea Halpin
To help improve health for Aboriginal people, the Central Australian Health Service is developing a smartphone app to deliver health information in languages.
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Source: Institute for Aboriginal Development, Alice Springs
Publishing and sales of superb texts including Pitjantjatjara/ Yankunytjatjara to English Dictionary, Eastern and Central Arrernte to English Dictionary, Gamilaraay/Yuwaalaraay/Yuwaalayaay to English Dictionary, Learner’s Guide to Warumungu, Pintupi/Luritja Dictionary (3rd Edition), Ngaanyatjara and Ngaatjatjarra to English Dictonary, Central Anmatyerr Picture Dictionary, Kaytetye Picture Dictionary and many more.
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Source: Jenny Green
Video clips with explanations, and project notes. The Iltyem-Iltyem project aims to record and document traditional handsigns used by people in Central Australia.
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Source: Charles E. Grimes/Summer Institute of Linguistics (AuSIL)
The paper argues that the NT government and its education system continue to ignore solid research on best practice education in Indigenous communities. also includes an extensive bibliography on language and education in multilingual societies, many linked to online sources. [PDF]
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Source: Myf Turpin/IAD Press
The first comprehensive dictionary of the Kaytetye language, with sentence examples, finderlist, cultural information etc. See also the Jane Simpson’s review.
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Source: Charles Darwin University / Batchelor Institute / NT Government / ANU
LAAL (Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages) is a digital archive of endangered literature in Australian languages from the Northern Territory. Much of the literature is language teaching/literacy material created in schools, which is otherwise endangered by the instability of governmental support for mother tongue and bilingual programs. You can search the site by map, placename, language name, author, or category (such as Narrative or Language instruction). The literature materials are beautifully displayed and are viewable and downloadable as PDF or plain text. The site currently holds about 2250 books in 32 languages. Updates are posted on http://laal.cdu.edu.au/
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Source: Charles Darwin University and partners
The Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages has literature in over 25 languages from across the Northern Territory. This Android and iOS app enables users to download items from the archive, store them, and play them any time.
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Source: nginarra*
Regularly updated blog by ‘that munanga linguist’* on a range of topics related to Indigenous languages (mostly NT languages) and related matters, often entertaining and of current-affairs interest. See also Greg Dickson’s page on Academic.au.
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Source: Aboriginal Interpreter Service/Northern Territory Police/NT Attorney General
Police have jumped on the app paddywagon and have produced an app in collaboration with the Aboriginal Interpreter Service, with versions of police cautions in 18 languages to help Aboriginal people understand their rights when they are apprehended. WA police are now also developing such an app.
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Source: Skinnyfish Music
Darwin-based music publisher that works with and provides opportunities for Indigenous artists. Label includes artists, such as Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, who sing in indigenous languages
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Source: Brian Devlin
The future of the discontinued NT bilingual education programs is an issue of national and international concern. This article analyses the status and future of bilingual education programs in remote NT schools. It explains why bilingual education is so contested, resulting in the current unresolved compromise in schools and a political stalemate.
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